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What is the shortest, most cross-platform way to make a std::unordered_set CASE-INSENSITIVE container?

my_set.insert("Apples");  
my_set.insert("apples"); //Insert doesn't occur because of duplicate item

I know STL provides Hash and Pred. What should Hash be? What should Pred be? if they are not-builtins then please provide the code for them along with an example of their use (i.e. how do I declare std::unordered_set?).

Due to the Criticism I will elaborate on what I am trying to do. I need a high performance transparent HTTP proxy server, one of the things it does is looks up HTTP header fields quickly. HTTP header fields are defined as being case-insensitive so I need a case-insensitive container.

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have you tried inheriting it, and overriding the methods for adding and getting elements from it? –  davogotland Dec 25 '11 at 0:53
9  
@davogotland, STL containers are not designed for inheritance. –  Don Reba Dec 25 '11 at 1:04
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3 Answers 3

up vote 7 down vote accepted

The definition of unordered_set is

  template <class Value,
            class Hash = hash<Value>,
            class Pred = std::equal_to<Value>,
            class Alloc = std::allocator<Value> >
  class unordered_set;

If you provide Hash and Pred functors that are case-insensitive, then the set will become so too.

This is a simple example, the string hash function is simplistic but you can change it to your needs

struct MyHash
{
    size_t operator()(const std::string& Keyval) const
    {
        //You might need a better hash function than this
        size_t h = 0;
        std::for_each( Keyval.begin() , Keyval.end() , [&](char c )
        {
            h += tolower(c);
        });
        return h;
    }
};

struct MyEqual
{
    bool operator()(const std::string& Left, const std::string& Right) const
    {
        return Left.size() == Right.size() 
             && std::equal ( Left.begin() , Left.end() , Right.begin() ,
            []( char a , char b )
        {
            return tolower(a) == tolower(b); 
        }
        );
    }
};


int main()
{
    std::unordered_set< std::string , MyHash , MyEqual > m;

    m.insert( "Apple" );
    m.insert( "apple" );

    return 0;
}
share|improve this answer
2  
Although you should stick to either tolower or toupper in both MyHash and MyEqual because they aren't always transitive. Better yet is to use proper case folding described in the Unicode Specification. –  dalle Dec 25 '11 at 9:28
1  
The trouble with that is the values are not case insensitive. If you iterate across the set will it return 'Apple' or 'apple'? –  Loki Astari Dec 25 '11 at 10:15
1  
@LokiAstari Whatever is put in first? the second insert would fail. –  unixman83 Dec 25 '11 at 10:58
2  
@LokiAstari: en.cppreference.com/w/cpp/container/unordered_set/insert "returns a pair consisting of a bool denoting whether the insertion took place and an iterator to the inserted element" –  dalle Dec 25 '11 at 15:48
2  
@dalle: Please don't quote that site at me (its horrible and has lots of inaccuracies and the developers opinion (which are not always correct)). What you want is n3242 23.2.4 Associative containers [associative.reqmts] Where you will find Table 103 — Unordered associative container requirements (in addition to container). If you don't have a copy of the standard please get one: stackoverflow.com/a/4653479/14065 –  Loki Astari Dec 25 '11 at 20:21
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Personally i would define a value type that was case insensitive and that devolves into a string at the merest hint. Thus allowing me to use the standard hash and predicate models.

#include <string>
#include <unordered_set>
#include <iostream>
#include <algorithm>
#include <iterator>

class LCString
{
    std::string  data;

    public:
        operator std::string&()             {return data;}
        operator std::string const&() const {return data;}

        LCString(char const* init)
        {
            std::transform(init, init + strlen(init),
                           std::back_inserter(data), &::tolower);
        }
};

int main()
{
    typedef std::unordered_set<LCString, 
                               std::hash<std::string>, 
                               std::equal_to<std::string> >  MySet;
    MySet  data;
    data.insert("Apples");
    data.insert("apples");

    std::copy(data.begin(), data.end(),
              std::ostream_iterator<std::string>(std::cout, " - "));
    std::cout << "\n";
}

Thus we only put lowercase values into the set:

> g++ pl.cpp
> ./a.out
apples -
>

Edit Case Preserving:

class LCStringOriginalPreserved
{
    std::string  original;
    std::string  data;

    public:
        operator std::string&()             {return data;}
        operator std::string const&() const {return data;}

        std::string& getOriginal()          {return original;}

        LCString(char const* init)
          : original(init)
        {
            std::transform(original.begin(), original.end(),
                           std::back_inserter(data), &::tolower);
        }
};
share|improve this answer
    
This is a good idea, but what if I need Case-Preserving / Case-Insensitive behavior. It doesn't preserve the case. –  unixman83 Dec 25 '11 at 10:54
    
@unixman83: If you go: data.insert("Apple");data.insert("apple"); Which version do you expect to be in the set? You now can't have case preserving as a random one will be lost. So the concept of case preserving on a case insensitive set does not make sense. Now if you had said unordered_multiset that would have made sense. But the above is easily extended. Just add another field to LCString to store the original value so you can retrieve it explicitly. –  Loki Astari Dec 25 '11 at 10:57
1  
I expect the first one I inserted to be in the set, the one with the desired case. –  unixman83 Dec 25 '11 at 11:50
    
@unixman83: It is what you will probably get in most situations, but there is nothing in the standard that will guarantee that with anything presented here. To provide that guarantee you will have jump through a couple more hoops. But as I said previously that requirement does not make sense. –  Loki Astari Dec 25 '11 at 12:03
1  
@LokiAstari Huh? If he just uses a case-insensitive comparator he is guartanteed to have the first insert in the set, because the second one does not insert anything, because well, it is already in the set. Perfectly standard-defined behaviour. –  Christian Rau Dec 25 '11 at 14:48
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I like this better.

Works on Linux.

#include <strings.h>
#include <ctype.h>

#include <string>
#include <functional>
#include <tr1/functional_hash.h>

struct iequal_to : public std::binary_function <std::string,std::string,bool>
{
  bool operator() (const std::string& x, const std::string& y) const
  {
    return (!strcasecmp(x.c_str(), y.c_str()));
  }
};

const std::string LC(const std::string& x)
{
  std::string ret(x);
  std::string::size_type i;
  for(i = 0; i < x.size(); ++i)
    ret[i] = tolower(x[i]);
  return ret;
}

struct ihash : public std::unary_function <std::string,size_t>
{
  size_t ihash::operator() (const std::string& x) const
  {
    return std::tr1::hash<std::string>()(LC(x));
  }
};
share|improve this answer
    
Better than what? This is not an answer! Isn't this just a rephrased version of parapura's answer? Completely obsolete! What is strcasecmp? And do you really create a new string everytime the hash function is called? –  Christian Rau Dec 25 '11 at 9:14
    
strcasecmp is standard in Linux's glibc C library (see stricmp). –  unixman83 Dec 25 '11 at 11:49
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