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I have 3 textbox's in WPF bound to three properties of my business object. The texboxes allow the user to enter three different lengths.

I then have a number of textblocks bound to other properties which display simple calculations from the 3 inputs. The values of these properties are calculated in the get method of each property as follows:

public double Length1 { get; set }
public double Length2 { get; set }
public double Length3 { get; set }
public double Result1 
{
    get { return Length1 - Length2 - Length3; }
}
public double Result2
{
    get { return Length1 + Length2 + Length3; }
}

How can i update the bindings of Result1 and Result2 after changes made to Lengths1,2 or 3?

Thanks

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up vote 3 down vote accepted

If your ViewModel is imnplementing the INotifyPropertyChanged event, you want to (unfortunately) ditch those auto properties, and raise the PropertyChanged event whenever Length1, Length2 or Length3 are changed.

PropertyChanged(this, new PropertyChangedEventArgs("Result1"));

private double _length1;
public double Length1 {
   get { return _length1; }
   set {
       _length = value;  
       PropertyChanged(this, new PropertyChangedEventArgs("Result1"));
       PropertyChanged(this, new PropertyChangedEventArgs("Result2"));
       PropertyChanged(this, new PropertyChangedEventArgs("Length1"));
   }

But this gets tiring pretty quick, so I usually implement a helper method:

void RaiseThese(params string[] properties){
   foreach(string prop in properties)
       PropertyChanged(this, new PropertyChangedEventArgs(prop));
}

And then

public double Length1 {
   get { return _length1; }
   set {
       _length = value;  
       RaiseThese("Result1", "Result2", "Length1");
   }
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks Adam, thought i may have to go this way. The use of the delegate is nice. – Cadair Idris Dec 25 '11 at 8:20

Use INotifyPropertyChanged and raise the Event for Result1 and Result2 in Length1, Length2 and Length3.

private double _length1;
public double Length1
{
    get { return _length1; }
    set
    {
        if (_length1 == value) return;
        _length1 = value;
        OnPropertyChanged("Length1");
        OnPropertyChanged("Result1");
        OnPropertyChanged("Result2");
    }
}

public event PropertyChangedEventHandler PropertyChanged;
private void OnPropertyChanged(string propertyName)
{
    PropertyChangedEventHandler handler = PropertyChanged;
    if (handler != null)
    {
        handler(this, new PropertyChangedEventArgs(propertyName));
    }
}   
share|improve this answer
    
A trick I learned from Jon Skeet's book - you can avoid those annoying null checks by declaring your events like this public event PropertyChangedEventHandler PropertyChanged = delegate {}; – Adam Rackis Dec 25 '11 at 2:10
    
@Adam I know, thanks. There are many diskussions about this, e.g. Avoid checking for null event handlers or Is there a downside to adding an anonymous empty delegate on event declaration? – LPL Dec 25 '11 at 10:09

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