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<textarea cols='60' rows='8'>This is my statement one./n This is my statement2</textarea>

<textarea cols='60' rows='8'>This is my statement one.<br/> This is my statement2</textarea>

I tried both but new line is not reflecting while rendering the html file. How can I do that?

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2  
Also, it's \n, not /n :) –  ViniciusPires Jun 4 at 14:19

5 Answers 5

up vote 99 down vote accepted

Try this one:

<textarea cols='60' rows='8'>This is my statement one.&#13;&#10;This is my statement2</textarea>

&#10; - Line Feed and &#13; Carriage Return are HTML entitieswikipedia. This way you are actually parsing the new line ("\n") rather than displaying it as text.

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I have been hunting all over the Internet for this solution. Thanks a lot! –  zykadelic Mar 2 '13 at 0:07
<textarea cols='60' rows='8'>This is my statement one.

This is my statement2</textarea>

Fiddle showing that it works: http://jsfiddle.net/trott/5vu28/.

If you really want this to be on a single line in the source file, you could insert the HTML character references for a line feed and a carriage return as shown in the answer from @Bakudan:

<textarea cols='60' rows='8'>This is my statement one.&#13;&#10;This is my statement2</textarea>
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try this.. it works:

<textarea id="test" cols='60' rows='8'>This is my statement one.&#10;This is my statement2</textarea>

replacing for
tags:

$("textarea#test").val(replace($("textarea#test").val(), "<br>", "&#10;")));
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1  
its actually $("textarea#test").val().replace(/\n/g, "&#10;"); (this will replace all occurrences of new line) –  Symba Dec 3 '13 at 13:58

To get a new line inside textarea, put an actual linebreak there:

<textarea cols='60' rows='8'>This is my statement one.
This is my statement2</textarea>
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You might want to use \n instead of /n.

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2  
Well, a literal \n won't work either, it would need to be an actual newline. –  Greg Hewgill Dec 25 '11 at 2:14
    
Yes, of course. But I'm (incorrectly?) assuming that he already knew this. –  Zar Dec 25 '11 at 2:16

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