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In §12 of the standard every special member function has a set of rules which cause it to be implicitly declared as defaulted and another set of rules which cause a defaulted [special member function to be] defined as deleted.

This makes it seem (to me) that there are 3 potential states when no user-declared version is present for special member functions: declared and defined (defaulted), declared and undefined (deleted), and undeclared. Is this accurate? If so, what point is there as opposed to cutting out the 'undeclared' option?

* declared as defaulted seems like a mistake, shouldn't it be "defined" as defaulted?

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@downvoter Why? Let me know so I can fix it. –  Dave Dec 25 '11 at 3:47
    
I only have N3290 to read right now and the relevant place is 8.4.2 and 8.4.3. Are you referring to a draft or the final released standard? –  pmr Dec 25 '11 at 4:08
    
Chapter 12 Special member functions [special]. Is in n3242 –  Loki Astari Dec 25 '11 at 7:32
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2 Answers

up vote 5 down vote accepted

The difference between a deleted constructor and an implicitly undeclared constructor is that the deleted constructor participates in overload resolution, whereas the constructor that doesn't exist, doesn't participate in overload resolution.

Example:

This class is default constructible. The compiler does not implicitly declare a defaulted constructor for it.

struct A
{
    template <class ...T>
    A(T...) {}
};

int main()
{
    A a;  // ok
}

If the compiler did declare a default constructor for it, and if that default constructor was defined as deleted, then A would not be default constructible. That can be simulated with:

struct A
{
    A() = delete;  // pretend the compiler implicitly declared and defined this

    template <class ...T>
    A(T...) {}
};

int main()
{
    A a;
}

error: call to deleted constructor of 'A'
    A a;
      ^

Similar problems appear with the move constructor. If the compiler decides to implicitly declare it and define it as deleted, then one can not construct such a class from an rvalue, even if it has a viable copy constructor:

#include <type_traits>

struct A
{
    A();
    A(const A&);
    A(A&&) = delete;  // pretend compiler declared and defined
};

int main()
{
    A a = std::declval<A>();
}

error: call to deleted constructor of 'A'
    A a = std::declval<A>();
      ^   ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

But if the compiler does not implicitly declare a deleted move constructor, then things just work:

#include <type_traits>

struct A
{
    A();
    A(const A&);
};

int main()
{
    A a = std::declval<A>();  // ok
}

Indeed, if the compiler did implicitly declare a deleted move constructor for A, there would be a awful lot of broken C++98/03 code when recompiled in C++11! :-)

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Thank you for the excellent answer! –  Dave Dec 25 '11 at 22:35
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I not sure I agree with your summary:

There are basically three states: User Defined, Deleted or Compiler Generated

  • declared and defined
    • This means the user has explicitly declared them in the class and provided definitions.
  • declared and deleted
    • This means the user has explicitly declared them as deleted (ie they are not available).
  • undeclared
    • The user has not provided a declaration (and thus can not provide a definition).
      In this case the the compiler will generate a version of the method.
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And the old way of doing declared and deleted: declared but not defined - the user has explicitly declared them in the class and but hasn't provided definitions. –  dalle Dec 25 '11 at 9:32
    
@dalle: That's not really a part of the language; that is just a linker error waiting to happen. But yes declared private and not defined is the C++03 equivalent of declared and deleted from C++11. The C++11 way is neater as you don't need to add an extra comment saying that it is deliberately not defined (please do not add a definition). And since it is part of the language can get flagged as an error much quicker. –  Loki Astari Dec 25 '11 at 9:42
    
@LokiAstari The 3 states I was questioning are "potential states when no user-declared version is present", they all fall under your last state. –  Dave Dec 25 '11 at 15:21
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