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I want to get a simple cube mapping going without using a texture atlas. I'm able to bind a see any one of my textures at any given time, but can't seem to do more than 1, let alone 6. Below is the code from my drawing loop.

    /*Cube to draw */
    gl.glVertexPointer(3, GL10.GL_FLOAT, 0, cube);

    gl.glBindTexture(GL10.GL_TEXTURE_2D, mTextures[2]);
    gl.glTexCoordPointer(2, GL10.GL_FLOAT, 0, circleTexCoords);     
    gl.glDrawArrays(GL10.GL_TRIANGLE_STRIP, 4, 4);
    gl.glBindTexture(GL10.GL_TEXTURE_2D, mTextures[3]);
    gl.glDrawArrays(GL10.GL_TRIANGLE_STRIP, 0, 4);
    gl.glBindTexture(GL10.GL_TEXTURE_2D, mTextures[4]);
    gl.glDrawArrays(GL10.GL_TRIANGLE_STRIP, 8, 4);
    gl.glBindTexture(GL10.GL_TEXTURE_2D, mTextures[5]);
    gl.glDrawArrays(GL10.GL_TRIANGLE_STRIP, 12, 4);
    gl.glBindTexture(GL10.GL_TEXTURE_2D, mTextures[6]);
    gl.glDrawArrays(GL10.GL_TRIANGLE_STRIP, 16, 4);
    gl.glBindTexture(GL10.GL_TEXTURE_2D,mTextures[7]);
    gl.glDrawArrays(GL10.GL_TRIANGLE_STRIP, 20, 4);

Am I missing something fundamental here?

Things I have done an checked: Yes, I generated a texture buffer. Yes, I properly loaded and bound textures from my resources. Yes, the above code works when instead of binding textures I draw it with glColorf

I appreciate your help.

Edit:

How I generated cube:

private float box[] = new float[] {
        // FRONT
        -0.5f, -0.5f,  0.5f,
         0.5f, -0.5f,  0.5f,
        -0.5f,  0.5f,  0.5f,
         0.5f,  0.5f,  0.5f,
        // BACK
        -0.5f, -0.5f, -0.5f,
        -0.5f,  0.5f, -0.5f,
         0.5f, -0.5f, -0.5f,
         0.5f,  0.5f, -0.5f,
        // LEFT
        -0.5f, -0.5f,  0.5f,
        -0.5f,  0.5f,  0.5f,
        -0.5f, -0.5f, -0.5f,
        -0.5f,  0.5f, -0.5f,
        // RIGHT
         0.5f, -0.5f, -0.5f,
         0.5f,  0.5f, -0.5f,
         0.5f, -0.5f,  0.5f,
         0.5f,  0.5f,  0.5f,
        // TOP
        -0.5f,  0.5f,  0.5f,
         0.5f,  0.5f,  0.5f,
         -0.5f,  0.5f, -0.5f,
         0.5f,  0.5f, -0.5f,
        // BOTTOM
        -0.5f, -0.5f,  0.5f,
        -0.5f, -0.5f, -0.5f,
         0.5f, -0.5f,  0.5f,
         0.5f, -0.5f, -0.5f,
};

 /* Initialize values for cube */
 ByteBuffer bb = ByteBuffer.allocateDirect(Float.SIZE * box.length);
 bb.order(ByteOrder.nativeOrder());
 cube = bb.asFloatBuffer();
 cube.put(box);
 cube.rewind();

CircleTexCoords is a misnomer, I'm using it as a unit texture coordinates for several different textures:

 bb = ByteBuffer.allocateDirect(Float.SIZE * 8);
 bb.order(ByteOrder.nativeOrder());
 circleTexCoords = bb.asFloatBuffer();
 circleTexCoords.put( new float[] { 0f, 1f, 1f, 1f, 0f, 0f, 1f, 0f});
 circleTexCoords.rewind();
share|improve this question
    
What do cube and circleTexCoords contain? –  Christian Rau Dec 25 '11 at 9:19
    
Code for generating these added. –  nmjohn Dec 25 '11 at 17:06
    
Ah got it, I guessed it! –  Christian Rau Dec 25 '11 at 20:06

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Your vertex arrays don't match. When drawing from the currently enabled attribute arrays, in your case vertex and tecCoords, The arrays have to match in size of course. When you call glDrawArrays(..., 8, 4) you instruct OpenGL to draw 4 array elements (vertices) starting at the 8th element. But your texCoord array contains only 4 vertices, what should the texCoords of the vertices 4-23 be in your vertex array? Or how should OpenGL know that you want to repeat the texCoords for each 4 consecutive vertices.

So in order for it to work, you need to repeat the texCoords yourself. Always keep in mind that the sizes of all enabled arrays have to match when drawing from them (at least up to the last drawn element). So your idea of reusing this small circleTexCoords array won't work.

This is because conceptually a vertex is not just a position, but the compaund of all attributes (positions, normals, texCoords, ...). Likewise is a vertex not only an element from the array bound to glVertexPointer, but from all currently enabled arrays. That's also the reason why you cannot have a single vertex with two different texCoords without duplication in OpenGL, because well, then it wouldn't be a single vertex anymore. It was a bit of a bad choice to name the position attribute vertex in OpenGL, though this is more for legacy reasons and has been cleaned up in modern OpenGL.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for the answer and explanation Christian. This makes perfect sense and I verified that these changes do in fact work as desired. –  nmjohn Dec 26 '11 at 3:46

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