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It is to be used for designing a sample database.

Is it 3NF or BCNF?

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a little more detail would be great. –  phpGeek Dec 25 '11 at 14:26

2 Answers 2

Based on those dependencies, the only key is {a,b}. Therefore {a,b,c,d,e} has a transitive dependency: ab->d, and d->e. Since it has a transitive dependency, {a,b,c,d,e} is not in 3NF.

It's probably in 2NF, but I can't tell for certain without knowing the meaning of the columns or knowing representative values. For example, if column c contained a varying number of telephone numbers, it probably wouldn't even be in 1NF. (In computer science homework, you can generally assume that each column contains a single value. On SO, you generally can't.)

When you normalize a relation, you project a subset of attributes based on the dependencies. (Based on functional dependencies in your case.) So you might replace the original relation with these two.

  • {a,b,c,d}
  • {d,e}

The first of these is probably in at least 4NF. The second is probably in 6NF. (But see paragraph 2 above.)

Normalization doesn't say you can move from 2NF to 3NF and no higher, from 3NF to BCNF and no higher, from BCNF to 4NF and no higher, and so on. But this is a common misunderstanding of how normalization works. In your case, decomposing the original relation yields one relation in 4NF (at least) and one relation in 6NF. By definition, both those are also in 3NF, but there isn't a normal (cough) way to decompose your 2NF relation to get relations in 3NF and no higher.

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Fine, yet what would one choose from 3NF and BCNF? –  pop stack Jan 2 '12 at 15:17
    
If you don't remove the transitive dependency, it can't be in either 3NF or BCNF. If you remove the transitive dependency, both tables are probably beyond BCNF. So you wouldn't choose either 3NF or BCNF. –  Mike Sherrill 'Cat Recall' Jan 2 '12 at 17:40

The normalform's goal is to formally specify and guarantee a certain quality of a schema. E. g. a schema meeting only the second normalform's conditions contains attributes/functional dependencies that don't belong into a schema together, resulting in redundancy and anomalies. original schema: ({A, B, C, D, E, F}, {A → B C, C → A D, E → A B C, F → C D, C D → B E F, A B → D}) prime-attributes: {A, C, E, F}, candidate-keys: {A}, {C}, {E}, {F} non-prime-attributes: {B, D}

  1. Normalform: Has to be assumed for the other normalforms.

  2. Normalform: Each non-prime-attributes has to be fully functionally dependent from each candidate key.

The schema is in second normalform for sure!

  1. Normalform: For each functional dependency α → β α has to be a superkey or each attribute on the β-side must be trivial or a prime-key-attribute.

    The α-side {A} from A → B C is a superkey of the schema (i.e. the key contains at least the attributes of a candidate-key).

    The α-side {C} from C → A D is a superkey of the schema (i.e. the key contains at least the attributes of a candidate-key).

    The α-side {E} from E → A B C is a superkey of the schema (i.e. the key contains at least the attributes of a candidate-key).

    The α-side {F} from F → C D is a superkey of the schema (i.e. the key contains at least the attributes of a candidate-key).

    The α-side {C, D} from C D → B E F is a superkey of the schema (i.e. the key contains at least the attributes of a candidate-key).

    The α-side {A, B} from A B → D is a superkey of the schema (i.e. the key contains at least the attributes of a candidate-key).

The schema is at least in third normalform!

Boyce-Codd-Normalform : For each functional dependency α → β whether the α-side has to be a superkey or the functional dependency has to be trivial.

The α-side {A} from A → B C is a superkey of the schema (i.e. the key contains at least the attributes of a candidate-key).

The α-side {C} from C → A D is a superkey of the schema (i.e. the key contains at least the attributes of a candidate-key).

The α-side {E} from E → A B C is a superkey of the schema (i.e. the key contains at least the attributes of a candidate-key).

The α-side {F} from F → C D is a superkey of the schema (i.e. the key contains at least the attributes of a candidate-key).

The α-side {C, D} from C D → B E F is a superkey of the schema (i.e. the key contains at least the attributes of a candidate-key).

The α-side {A, B} from A B → D is a superkey of the schema (i.e. the key contains at least the attributes of a candidate-key).
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