Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

In the following program

class ZiggyTest2 {

    public static void main(String[] args){     

        double x = 123.456;
        char c = 65;
        int i = 65;

        System.out.printf("%s",x);
        System.out.printf("%b",x);
        System.out.printf("%c",c);
        System.out.printf("%5.0f",x);
        System.out.printf("%d",i);
    }       
}

The output is

123.456trueA  12365

Can someone please explain how a double value (i.e. 123.456) is converted to a boolean (ie. true)

The reason I ask is because I know java does not allow numbers to be used for boolean values. For example, the following is not allowed in Java

if (5) {
 //do something
}

Thanks

share|improve this question
up vote 70 down vote accepted

for "%b" : If the argument arg is null, then the result is "false". If arg is a boolean or Boolean, then the result is the string returned by String.valueOf(). Otherwise, the result is "true".

reference

share|improve this answer
1  
Yeah, so if you are C developer, be careful, because String.format("%b", 0) and String.format("%b", 1) will both return "true" – Sheng.W Nov 9 '15 at 9:01

The API documentation seems to clearly state why.

If the argument arg is null, then the result is "false". If arg is a boolean or Boolean, then the result is the string returned by String.valueOf(). Otherwise, the result is "true".

share|improve this answer

Because the value is of type double and this is how the %b converter works with values of this type.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.