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The following code segment demonstrate my problem:

import java.util.timer.*  

s = "Hello"
println s
class TimerTaskExample extends TimerTask {  
        public void run() {  
            //println new Date() 
            println s 
        }  
}  

int delay = 5000   // delay for 5 sec.  
int period = 10000  // repeat every sec.  
Timer timer = new Timer()  
timer.scheduleAtFixedRate(new TimerTaskExample(), delay, period)  

In my implementation of TimerTaskExample, I'd like to access s which is created in the "global" script scope. But I got the following trace:

Hello
Exception in thread "Timer-2" 
groovy.lang.MissingPropertyException: No such property: s for class: TimerTaskExample
at         org.codehaus.groovy.runtime.ScriptBytecodeAdapter.unwrap(ScriptBytecodeAdapter.java:50)
at     org.codehaus.groovy.runtime.callsite.GetEffectivePogoPropertySite.getProperty(GetEffectivePogoPropertySite.java:86)
at     org.codehaus.groovy.runtime.callsite.AbstractCallSite.callGroovyObjectGetProperty(AbstractCallSite.java:231)
at TimerTaskExample.run(ConsoleScript2:8)

I tried google around, but couldn't find a solution.

Thanks a lot!

Yu SHen

share|improve this question
up vote 1 down vote accepted

Although s (without the def) is defined in the binding, it is not accessible in a class you define in the script. To get access to s in your TimerTaskExample class, you can proceed as follows:

class TimerTaskExample extends TimerTask {  
    def binding
    public void run() {  
        println binding.s 
    }  
}  

new TimerTaskExample(binding:binding)
share|improve this answer
    
Passing around bindings outside of a DSL context is asking for trouble, IMO. Better to design things correctly than to resort to such a blunt instrument. – Dave Newton Feb 13 '14 at 13:53

It looks like you're using a Groovy script.

The only things a method has access to are:

  • Attributes defined by the base class
  • The dynamic properties defined by the MetaClass
  • The binding

Scripts allow the use of undeclared variables (without def), in which case these variables are assumed to come from the script’s binding and are added to the binding if not yet there.

name = 'Dave'
def foo() {
    println name
}

foo()

For each script, Groovy generates a class that extends groovy.lang.Script, which contains a main method so that Java can execute it. In my example, I have only one class:

public class script1324839515179 extends groovy.lang.Script {
    def name = 'Dave'
    def foo() {
        println name
    }
    ...
}

What's happening in your example? You have two classes and the binding variables are in the Script class. TimerTaskExample doesn't know anything about s:

public class script1324839757462 extends groovy.lang.Script {
    def s = "Hello"
    ...
}

public class TimerTaskExample implements groovy.lang.GroovyObject extends java.util.TimerTask {
    void run() {
        println s
    }
    ...
}
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks! But I thought that by writing "s="Hello" in the script scope without "def", it would be part of the binding? But it's not. I'm still confused about how the binding is constructed. – Yu Shen Dec 26 '11 at 10:21
    
Check this: Scoping and the Semantics of "def" – Arturo Herrero Dec 26 '11 at 10:47

Groovy doesn't have a "global" scope per se; IMO it's cleanest to keep such "globals" in a class, defined as static finals, as in Java:

public class Constants {
  static final String S = "Hello"
}

println Constants.S
class TimerTaskExample extends TimerTask {  
  public void run() {  
    println Constants.S  
  }  
}  
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks! I tried your method. It worked for my case. I also learned that variable/object defined in script does not automatically become global, which I assumed. I wish there is a more comprehensive tutor of Groovy. With its closeness to Java, I find it hard to fine one. – Yu Shen Dec 25 '11 at 23:32

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