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Hi I have a base class MyBase. that contain a pure virtual function

void PrintStartMessage() = 0

I want that each derived class to call it in their constructor

then I put it in base class(MyBase) constructor

 class MyBase
 {
 public:

      virtual void PrintStartMessage() =0;
      MyBase()
      {
           PrintStartMessage();
      }

 };

 class Derived:public MyBase
 {     

 public:
      void  PrintStartMessage(){

      }
 };

void main()
 {
      Derived derived;
 }

but I get a linker error.

 this is error message : 

 1>------ Build started: Project: s1, Configuration: Debug Win32 ------
 1>Compiling...
 1>s1.cpp
 1>Linking...
 1>s1.obj : error LNK2019: unresolved external symbol "public: virtual void __thiscall MyBase::PrintStartMessage(void)" (?PrintStartMessage@MyBase@@UAEXXZ) referenced in function "public: __thiscall MyBase::MyBase(void)" (??0MyBase@@QAE@XZ)
 1>C:\Users\Shmuelian\Documents\Visual Studio 2008\Projects\s1\Debug\s1.exe : fatal error LNK1120: 1 unresolved externals
 1>s1 - 2 error(s), 0 warning(s)

I want froce to all Derived class

A- impelment it

B- call to it in counstrucetor 

how I must do it ?

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How is it that your error says something about class A but your classes are named Derived and MyBase? Post the actual code please. –  Luchian Grigore Dec 25 '11 at 15:16
    
It might help if you clean up your class names in the example you provide. Your main references class "p", which isn't provided, and the linker error references class "A". –  Ben Hocking Dec 25 '11 at 15:17
    
Can you show us the line where that error occurs, it doesn't seem to occur because of what you want! –  Tamer Shlash Dec 25 '11 at 15:17
    
Why does an abstract class even have a constructor at all? You can't create an instance of it, because of the pure virtual method. This isn't valid code. –  ssube Dec 25 '11 at 15:23
    
@peachykeen What could you do with a class without a constructor? You couldn't construct it! –  curiousguy Dec 25 '11 at 21:49

5 Answers 5

up vote 4 down vote accepted

There are many articles that explain why you should never call virtual functions in constructor and destructor in C++. Take a look here and here for details what happens behind the scene during such calls.

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The closest you can get to doing something like that is to fully construct your object first and then calling the method after:

template <typename T>
T construct_and_print()
{
  T obj;
  obj.PrintStartMessage();

  return obj;
}

int main()
{
    Derived derived = construct_and_print<Derived>();
}

Trying to call a pure abstract method from a derived while that object is still being constructed is unsafe. It's like trying to fill gas into a car but that car is still on the assembly line and the gas tank hasn't been put in yet. I mean what the hell do you expect to happen?

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4  
"It's like trying to fill gas into a car but that car is still on the assembly line and the gas tank hasn't been put in yet." Excellent! –  curiousguy Dec 26 '11 at 1:40
    
Personally, I expect to be able to be able to centralise a common initialising sequence using values configured by the subclass, a common pattern in other languages like Obj-C, Ruby, Python (dynamic I know) –  Hari Karam Singh Dec 15 '13 at 10:13

You shouldn't call a virtual function in a constructor. Period. You'll have to find some workaround, like making PrintStartMessage non-virtual and putting the call explicitly in every constructor.

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I want froce to all Derived class impelment it,and call to it in counstrucetor How I can do it? –  herzl shemuelian Dec 25 '11 at 15:19
2  
@herzlshemuelian: you can't. –  larsmans Dec 25 '11 at 15:24
    
@herzlshemuelian Like he said: not! –  Christian Rau Dec 25 '11 at 15:27
    
What's with the downvotes? –  larsmans Dec 25 '11 at 15:27
2  
Just to make it clearer, One can call a virtual functions from constructor or destructor as well, Just that it will not result in calling the derived class versions of the functions as one would expect. The this in constructor and destructor is always of the type of the class whose constructor or destructor is being called and hence the dynamic dispatch results in calling of the Base class versions of the overidden functions. –  Alok Save Dec 25 '11 at 16:02

If PrintStartMessage() was not a pure virtual function but a normal virtual function, the compiler would not complain about it. However you would still have to figure out why the derived version of PrintStartMessage() is not being called.

Since the derived class calls the base class's constructor before its own constructor, the derived class behaves like the base class and therefore calls the base class's function.

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You can't. But you don't need to. Change your function to be the constructor, and voila, it works the way you want:

class MyBase
{
public:
    MyBase()
    {
    }
};

class Derived:public MyBase
{     
public:
    Derived(){
        // do here what you wanted to be done in PrintStartMessage
    }
};

int main()
{
    Derived derived;
}
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