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In the code below I am not able to understand the way in which the virtual methods of the derived class is being called. Also, can anyone suggest a source where the concepts of virtual function is explained diagrammatically with very basic approach.

class Base1
{
  virtual void fun1() { cout << "Base1::fun1()" << endl; }
  virtual void func1() { cout << "Base1::func1()" << endl; }
};


class Base2 
{
  virtual void fun1() { cout << "Base2::fun1()" << endl; }
  virtual void func1() { cout << "Base2::func1()" << endl; }
};


class Base3 
{
    virtual void fun1() { cout << "Base3::fun1()" << endl; }
    virtual void func1() { cout << "Base3::func1()" << endl; }
};

class Derive : public Base1, public Base2, public Base3
{

public:

  virtual void Fn()
  {
    cout << "Derive::Fn" << endl;
  }

  virtual void Fnc()
  {
    cout << "Derive::Fnc" << endl;
  }
};


typedef void(*Fun)(void);

int main()
{
  Derive obj;
  Fun pFun = NULL;

  // calling 1st virtual function of Base1
  pFun = (Fun)*((int*)*(int*)((int*)&obj+0)+0);
  pFun();

  // calling 2nd virtual function of Base1
  pFun = (Fun)*((int*)*(int*)((int*)&obj+0)+1);
  pFun();

  // calling 1st virtual function of Base2
  pFun = (Fun)*((int*)*(int*)((int*)&obj+1)+0);

  pFun();

  // calling 2nd virtual function of Base2

  pFun = (Fun)*((int*)*(int*)((int*)&obj+1)+1);
  pFun();

  // calling 1st virtual function of Base3
  pFun = (Fun)*((int*)*(int*)((int*)&obj+2)+0);
  pFun();

  // calling 2nd virtual function of Base3
  pFun = (Fun)*((int*)*(int*)((int*)&obj+2)+1);

  pFun();

  // calling 1st virtual function of Drive
  pFun = (Fun)*((int*)*(int*)((int*)&obj+0)+2);
  pFun();

  // calling 2nd virtual function of Drive
  pFun = (Fun)*((int*)*(int*)((int*)&obj+0)+3);
  pFun();

  return 0;
}
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3  
Everything you do seems to be Undefined Behaviour, so there isn't a lot to explain. –  Kerrek SB Dec 25 '11 at 17:55
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2 Answers 2

up vote 5 down vote accepted

The inheritance diagram looks like this:

Base1  Base2  Base3

  \      |      /
   \     |     /
    \    |    /
     \   |   /

      Derived

There is no unambiguous function Derived::func1(). Morover, the virtual keyword is a red herring, because Derived isn't actually overriding anything. So the only question is how to call the various base functions. Here's how:

Derived x;

// x.func1(); // Error: no unambiguous base function

x.Base1::func1();
x.Base2::func1();
x.Base3::func1();

The story would be entirely different if you were to actually override func1() in Derived.

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What you are doing in the code shown is using "Member function pointer arithmetic" to access virtual functions of base classes, which is ugly as hell because of their weird syntax and they are completely compiler dependent.

I would recommend that you read this article on fast delegates to have a deeper understanding of how Member function pointers works with regards to different types of inheritances:

http://www.codeproject.com/KB/cpp/FastDelegate.aspx

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It is not just "compiler dependent"; it's undefined behaviour. The Standard does not require a vtable. –  Karl Knechtel Dec 25 '11 at 18:37
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