Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have an infinite loop in a separate thread operating on a List of strings. I want to be able to add strings to this list while the thread is runnning. I have a feeling the code I am writing is 'wrong'. In the infinite loop I am iterating through each string in the list and performing operations on it, so it seems like I can't just add a string to this list from my main thread, as I will be interfering with a variable that is concurrently being accessed by another thread. Here's what my code looks like -

class StringTest
{
public List<string> ListOfStrings = new List<string>();
public Task MainLoopTask;
bool IsRunning = false;

public void AddToList(string myString)
{
    ListOfStrings.Add(myString); // Adding a string to the list

    if (!IsRunning)
    {
        IsRunning = true;
        MainLoopTask = Task.Factory.StartNew(MainLoop);
    }
}

public void MainLoop()
{
    while (true)
    {
        foreach(string s in ListOfStrings) // Operating on the list in a separate thread
        {
            ...
            ...
            ...
        }
}

}

Is this bad code or is it ok? If it's is bad, what can I do to fix it?

share|improve this question

3 Answers 3

up vote 7 down vote accepted

That is not safe, and will eventually fail spectacularly in production.

Instead, you should use a thread-safe collection; probably a concurrent queue.

share|improve this answer
    
Ok, Im looking at concurrentqueue<T>. How can I iterate over this object as I need to do work on each string in the queue yet TryPeek only gives an item from the beginning of the queue? –  Jim_CS Dec 25 '11 at 19:46
1  
@JohnMcDonald: Keep calling TryPeek until it runs out of items. You probably want a blocking queue that will loop forever. msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/dd267312.aspx –  SLaks Dec 25 '11 at 19:48

List<T> is safe for concurrent reading. That is, it's perfectly safe (from a stability standpoint) to have multiple threads reading the list, but writing to the list can only be done from one thread and you may not allow other threads to read from it while writing is taking place.

The simplest solution, especially if you only have two threads, is to use a simple lock statement to prevent two threads from interacting with it at the same time.

For instance:

Replace this:

ListOfStrings.Add(myString);

With this:

lock(ListOfStrings)
{
    ListOfStrings.Add(myString);
}

And this:

foreach(string s in ListOfStrings) // Operating on the list in a separate thread
{
    ...
    ...
    ...
}

With this:

lock(ListOfStrings)
{
    foreach(string s in ListOfStrings) // Operating on the list in a separate thread
    {
        ...
        ...
        ...
    }
}

This will make sure that your code blocks don't execute at the same time by creating an exclusive lock on the ListOfStrings object. If the list is small and the operations are trivial, this is likely sufficient. If either is not true (the list is large or the operations are non-trivial), then you'll probably want something more robust, such as creating a copy of the list and clearing the original within the body of the lock statement, then having your thread operate on that copy of the list.

share|improve this answer
2  
However, that will severely reduce concurrency. –  SLaks Dec 25 '11 at 19:48
    
How so? What are the advantages of concurrentqueue or blockingcollection over this method? –  Jim_CS Dec 25 '11 at 20:00
1  
@John McDonald: Most likely concurrentqueue has a read-write lock instead of a full lock. That means multiple threads can read at the same time. If you use a plain lock only one thread can read or write at one time. –  Tudor Dec 26 '11 at 0:00
    
@SLaks: It will eliminate concurrency (in terms of both reading and modifying the list). This is the simplest solution to the OP's problem, but depending on what he actually wants to do there may be better approaches. ConcurrentQueue is certainly an option, but it's not the only option. –  Adam Robinson Dec 26 '11 at 2:13

This is not really an answer, but I cannot put code in a comment, so, I am writing as a reply to your comment to @SLaks which says "How so?"

If your AddToList method attempts to add a string while your MainLoop is in the middle of the foreach loop, your AddToList method will have to wait until the foreach loop is done. This can be remedied as follows:

public void MainLoop()
{
    while (true)
    {
        string item;
        lock( ListOfStrings )
        {
            if( ListOfStrings.Count == 0 )
                continue;
            item = ListOfStrings[0];
            ListOfStrings.RemoveAt( 0 );
        }
        //do something with item
    }
}

But using a thread-safe collection as SLaks proposed is still better because it is less hassle.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.