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I want to construct a data frame in an Rcpp function, but when I get it, it doesn't really look like a data frame. I've tried pushing vectors etc. but it leads to the same thing. Consider:

RcppExport SEXP makeDataFrame(SEXP in) {
    Rcpp::DataFrame dfin(in);
    Rcpp::DataFrame dfout;
    for (int i=0;i<dfin.length();i++) {
        dfout.push_back(dfin(i));
    }

    return dfout;
}

in R:

> .Call("makeDataFrame",mtcars,"myPkg")
[[1]]
 [1] 21.0 21.0 22.8 21.4 18.7 18.1 14.3 24.4 22.8 19.2 17.8 16.4 17.3 15.2 10.4
[16] 10.4 14.7 32.4 30.4 33.9 21.5 15.5 15.2 13.3 19.2 27.3 26.0 30.4 15.8 19.7
[31] 15.0 21.4

[[2]]
 [1] 6 6 4 6 8 6 8 4 4 6 6 8 8 8 8 8 8 4 4 4 4 8 8 8 8 4 4 4 8 6 8 4

[[3]]
 [1] 160.0 160.0 108.0 258.0 360.0 225.0 360.0 146.7 140.8 167.6 167.6 275.8
[13] 275.8 275.8 472.0 460.0 440.0  78.7  75.7  71.1 120.1 318.0 304.0 350.0
[25] 400.0  79.0 120.3  95.1 351.0 145.0 301.0 121.0

[[4]]
 [1] 110 110  93 110 175 105 245  62  95 123 123 180 180 180 205 215 230  66  52
[20]  65  97 150 150 245 175  66  91 113 264 175 335 109

[[5]]
 [1] 3.90 3.90 3.85 3.08 3.15 2.76 3.21 3.69 3.92 3.92 3.92 3.07 3.07 3.07 2.93
[16] 3.00 3.23 4.08 4.93 4.22 3.70 2.76 3.15 3.73 3.08 4.08 4.43 3.77 4.22 3.62
[31] 3.54 4.11

[[6]]
 [1] 2.620 2.875 2.320 3.215 3.440 3.460 3.570 3.190 3.150 3.440 3.440 4.070
[13] 3.730 3.780 5.250 5.424 5.345 2.200 1.615 1.835 2.465 3.520 3.435 3.840
[25] 3.845 1.935 2.140 1.513 3.170 2.770 3.570 2.780

[[7]]
 [1] 16.46 17.02 18.61 19.44 17.02 20.22 15.84 20.00 22.90 18.30 18.90 17.40
[13] 17.60 18.00 17.98 17.82 17.42 19.47 18.52 19.90 20.01 16.87 17.30 15.41
[25] 17.05 18.90 16.70 16.90 14.50 15.50 14.60 18.60

[[8]]
 [1] 0 0 1 1 0 1 0 1 1 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 1 1 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 1

[[9]]
 [1] 1 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 1 1 1 1 1

[[10]]
 [1] 4 4 4 3 3 3 3 4 4 4 4 3 3 3 3 3 3 4 4 4 3 3 3 3 3 4 5 5 5 5 5 4

[[11]]
 [1] 4 4 1 1 2 1 4 2 2 4 4 3 3 3 4 4 4 1 2 1 1 2 2 4 2 1 2 2 4 6 8 2
share|improve this question
2  
I don't know anything about Rcpp, really, but would it help you to know that in R itself, all data frames are actually lists? –  joran Dec 25 '11 at 19:53

4 Answers 4

up vote 3 down vote accepted

It seems Rcpp can return a proper data.frame, provided you supply the names explicitely. I'm not sure how to adapt this to your example with arbitrary names

mkdf <- '
    Rcpp::DataFrame dfin(input);
    Rcpp::DataFrame dfout;
    for (int i=0;i<dfin.length();i++) {
        dfout.push_back(dfin(i));
    }

    return Rcpp::DataFrame::create( Named("x")= dfout(1), Named("y") = dfout(2));
'
library(inline)
test <- cxxfunction( signature(input="data.frame"),
                              mkdf, plugin="Rcpp")

test(input=head(iris))
share|improve this answer
    
So apparently, we cannot create a dataframe where the number of columns is decided at run time? –  highBandWidth Dec 26 '11 at 5:08
3  
if by we you mean you and I, then it's probably correct ;) –  baptiste Dec 26 '11 at 6:15
    
I recall that you can determine the number of columns at run-time, and create a corresponding DataFrame, as I needed that once too. You can't use the static create in that situation though. –  Dirk Eddelbuettel Dec 27 '11 at 19:28

Briefly:

  • DataFrames are indeed just like lists with the added restriction of having to have a common length, so they are best constructed column by column.

  • The best way is often to look for our unit tests. Her inst/unitTests/runit.DataFrame.R regroups tests for the DataFrame class.

  • You also found the .push_back() member function in Rcpp which we added for convenience and analogy with the STL. We do warn that it is not recommended: due to differences with the may R objects are constructed, we essentially always need to do full copies .push_back is not very efficient.

  • Despite me answering here frequently, the rcpp-devel list a better place for Rcpp questions.

share|improve this answer
1  
as of now, I do not have a better way to add something to a data frame than the push_back. I put in the solution I could come up with. There is an internal function grow. +1 for pointing it out though. –  highBandWidth Dec 27 '11 at 18:58
    
I would grow the columns first (posisbly pre-allocating) and then assemble them in a data.frame. –  Dirk Eddelbuettel Dec 27 '11 at 19:25
    
so is there a way to assemble the columns in a data frame other than the static create? I didn't find anything that does this in the unit tests. –  highBandWidth Dec 27 '11 at 20:30
    
DateFrames are derived from Lists, so an example to grow a list could help. –  Dirk Eddelbuettel Dec 27 '11 at 20:43
    
There is a List and push_back() example in runit.Vector.R to append whole vectors to a list object. But if you know at run time you have N elements, you can also allocate for N and assign one by one. –  Dirk Eddelbuettel Dec 27 '11 at 20:53

Using the information from @baptiste's answer, this is what finally does give a well formed data frame:

RcppExport SEXP makeDataFrame(SEXP in) {
    Rcpp::DataFrame dfin(in);
    Rcpp::DataFrame dfout;
    Rcpp::CharacterVector namevec;
    std::string namestem = "Column Heading ";
    for (int i=0;i<2;i++) {
        dfout.push_back(dfin(i));
        namevec.push_back(namestem+std::string(1,(char)(((int)'a') + i)));
    }
    dfout.attr("names") = namevec;
    Rcpp::DataFrame x;
    Rcpp::Language call("as.data.frame",dfout);
    x = call.eval();
    return x;
}

I think the point remains that this might be inefficient due to push_back (as suggested by @Dirk) and the second Language call evaluation. I looked up the rcpp unitTests, and haven't been able to come up with something better yet. Anybody have any ideas?

Update:

Using @Dirk's suggestions (thanks!), this seems to be a simpler, efficient solution:

RcppExport SEXP makeDataFrame(SEXP in) {
    Rcpp::DataFrame dfin(in);
    Rcpp::List myList(dfin.length());
    Rcpp::CharacterVector namevec;
    std::string namestem = "Column Heading ";
    for (int i=0;i<dfin.length();i++) {
        myList[i] = dfin(i); // adding vectors
        namevec.push_back(namestem+std::string(1,(char)(((int)'a') + i))); // making up column names
    }
    myList.attr("names") = namevec;
    Rcpp::DataFrame dfout(myList);
    return dfout;
}
share|improve this answer
    
I tend to do the 'as.data.frame' at the R level. –  Dirk Eddelbuettel Dec 27 '11 at 19:25
    
I still don't understand what your function is supposed to do. Why do you have a data.frame on input? Your string handling is way too complicated (look, again, at the unit tests or the docs for string vectors in Rcpp). –  Dirk Eddelbuettel Dec 28 '11 at 15:02
    
The function doesn't do anything useful. I am just want to be able to form a data frame. I will actually be forming the frame from my own computations/data, but I just needed a template to put in column vectors and names together in a data frame, where forming the column vectors etc. is done in C++ since those computations are expensive in my program. The column headings/string handling is essentially garbage that I don't care about. –  highBandWidth Dec 28 '11 at 17:28

I concur with joran. The output of a C function called from within R is a list of all its arguments, both "in" and "out", so each "column" of the dataframe could be represented in the C function call as an argument. Once the result of the C function call is in R, all that remains to be done is to extract those list elements using list indexing and give them the appropriate names.

share|improve this answer
    
Huh? We are talking about C++ and Rcpp here, not plain C. –  Dirk Eddelbuettel Dec 30 '11 at 13:57

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