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Clearly, the intention of this animation is to turn all "editable" elements to a blue color in 300 ms, and then slowly fade back to the body background color over the course of 1000 ms. Basically, make them "blink".

$('#highlight_button').click( function (e) {
    var x = $('body').css('background-color');
    $('.editable').animate({backgroundColor: '#0000ff'}, 300, function() {
                    $('.editable').animate({backgroundColor: x}, 1000); 
    });
});

When the page loads, it always seems to work as intended on the first click. However, with subsequent clicks it fires only periodically, or with a very long delay. I suppose a solution would involve not queuing this animation, but looking around it isn't clear to me how to do this. Any thoughts? Thanks in advance!

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2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Try adding some stops to your animation, like so:

$('#highlight_button').click( function (e) {
    var x = $('body').css('background-color');
    $('.editable').stop(true, true).animate({backgroundColor: '#0000ff'}, 300, function() {
                    $('.editable').stop(true, true).animate({backgroundColor: x}, 1000); 
    });
});

Also, just chaining the second animation would probably do the same as putting it in the callback.

$('#highlight_button').click( function (e) {
    $('.editable').stop(true, true).animate({backgroundColor: '#0000ff'}, 300).animate({backgroundColor: $('body').css('background-color')}, 1000);
});
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Hm.. when I do that it seems to turn the bgcolor blue, and not animate to return the the normal bgcolor –  B. VB. Dec 25 '11 at 21:08
    
Thanks a lot, appreciate it. Seemed to fix my problem. Have a good day –  B. VB. Dec 25 '11 at 21:16
    
This solution will make overhead and also remove all other animation that element had before(may be in another function or script) –  Creotiv Dec 25 '11 at 22:22
    
How would stop() add overhead when clearQeue is set to true. It does exactly what your answer does and then some, in a much easier way! The only thing I agree on is that it will stop other animations running on the same element, but it will not remove them. This is usually not a problem for most applications, and stop() is recommended for most animations to prevent looping anyway. –  adeneo Dec 26 '11 at 13:38
    
Because you call +1 function, and will use animation stack.And it will be removed from stack because you played already. –  Creotiv Dec 26 '11 at 13:54

When you use jQuery.animate, each new aniamtion added to animation stack from wich then played. If you don't need such behavior just add queue param to the animation params, this make each new animation stop previous. Like so:

$('.editable').animate({backgroundColor: x}, {duration:1000, queue:false}); 
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