Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have two for loops nested like this:

for(...) {
    for(...) {

    }
}

I know that there is a break statement. But I am confused about if it breaks both loops or just the one in which it was called? I need to break both ones as soon as I see that it doesn't make sense to iterate more times over.

share|improve this question
add comment

12 Answers 12

up vote 59 down vote accepted

break breaks out of one loop, but you can add a check to the outer loop which breaks when the inner breaks.

bool dobreak = false;
for ( ..; !dobreak && ..; .. ) {
   for ( ... ) {
      if (...) {
         dobreak = true;
         break;
      }
   }
}
share|improve this answer
38  
IMHO, using goto is much cleaner. –  sigjuice May 14 '09 at 19:03
4  
!dobreak is in the wrong place; it should go in the conditional (for's second part) rather than the increment step (for's third part); I would also use !dobreak && .., so that the other conditions do not need to be evaluated when breaking. I agree with sigjuice: goto is not evil when used properly, and this is a case where goto does make for better code. –  ephemient May 15 '09 at 16:45
    
Thank you for point to the error in for statement. Fixed. –  zilupe May 15 '09 at 19:07
2  
This would still execute possible code in the outer loop that would come after the inner loop –  Martijn Sep 1 '10 at 20:04
    
@Martijn - this can be addressed by replacing the break with a continue statement. Still, it's just more non-obvious stuff to worry about. –  Ori Pessach Oct 25 '11 at 17:54
show 1 more comment

If using goto simplifies the code, then it would be appropriate.

for (;;) 
{
    for (;;) 
    {
        break; /* breaks inner loop */
    } 
    for (;;) 
    {
        goto outer; /* breaks outer loop */
    }
} 
outer:;
share|improve this answer
2  
To expand on this, for (;;) {for (;;) {break; /* breaks inner loop */} for (;;) {goto outer; /* breaks outer loop */}} outer:; –  ephemient May 14 '09 at 13:46
    
ephemient: Thanks. I added your code snippet to the answer. –  Ori Pessach Sep 24 '09 at 19:00
1  
(;;) looks like a little face. –  yourfriendzak Mar 28 '13 at 19:14
2  
omg, Objective QuickBasic! –  dklt May 2 '13 at 4:04
add comment

The break statement only gets you out of the innermost loop. If you don't want the added overhead in code, memory and performance of a dedicated state variable, I recommend refactoring the code out into a function or method of its own, and using return to get out of all the loops:

void do_lots_of_work(void)
{
  int i, j;

  for(i=0; i<10 ; i++)
  {
    for(j=0;j< 10; j++)
    {
     ..
     ..
     if(disaster_struck())
      return; /* Gets us out of the loops, and the function too. */
    }
  }
}
share|improve this answer
    
I'd be very surprised if a function call in a loop managed to perform as well as a dedicated state variable, especially if you need to pass arguments in order to have access to variables in the outer function. Maybe if the compiler copies the function inline... –  ephemient May 14 '09 at 17:36
6  
What's worse, in my opinion, is the loss of the ability to understand the algorithm by reading it in one place. All this to avoid a goto? –  Ori Pessach May 15 '09 at 14:35
    
I've run into this break/continue problem as well, sometimes wanting to continue the loop 2-3 levels up. Best thing to do IMHO is to refactor the nested loops into a method so that method can return whether to continue to parent loop. –  Jason Feb 2 '10 at 20:33
    
what if the user wants to exit only the loop and not the function? –  Akshay J Jun 29 '11 at 16:38
add comment

Other than the already mentioned flag variable or goto you could throw an Objective-C exception:

@try {
  for() {
    for() {
       @throw ...
    }
  }
}
@catch{
  ...
}
share|improve this answer
4  
Wow, just as I was about to modify my answer to point out how people will suggest every single convoluted solution except using exceptions for flow control just to avoid a goto... –  Ori Pessach May 15 '09 at 14:37
4  
@Ori Pessach Well Exceptions are the modern OO versions of goto ;-) –  lothar May 15 '09 at 15:43
1  
They do clean up the stack nicely, at least. –  Ori Pessach May 15 '09 at 16:05
    
In my experiences exceptions are very very slow and should not be used to handle execution flow. –  Nathan Adams May 25 '13 at 3:04
1  
Do some research on exceptions in ObjC. In the Apple docs they specifically that performance hit is big and they say, "The Cocoa frameworks are generally not exception-safe. The general pattern is that exceptions are reserved for programmer error only, and the program catching such an exception should quit soon afterwards." –  orange80 Sep 17 '13 at 3:28
add comment

Others have mentioned how you can set a flag or use a goto, but I'd recommend refactoring your code so that the inner loop is turned into a separate method. That method can then return some flag to indicate that the outer loop should break. If you name your methods appropriately, this is much more readable.

for (int i = 0; i < 10; i++) {
   if (timeToStop(i)) break;
}

-(bool) timeToStop: (int) i {
    for (int j = 0; j < 10; j++) {
        if (somethingBadHappens) return true;
    }

    return false;
}

Pseudocode, not tested, but you get the idea.

share|improve this answer
add comment

The break statement will only break out of the loop in scope, which is the parent loop. If you want to break out of the second loop as well you could use a boolean variable which is in scope of both loops

bool isTerminated = false;

for (...)
{
    if (!isTerminated)
    {
        for(...)
        {
            ...

            isTerminated = true;
            break;
        }
    }
    else
    {
        break;
    }
}
share|improve this answer
add comment

Probably the easiest way is to use a "flag" variable

for(i=0; i<10 && (done==false); i++)
  for(j=0;j< 10; j++){
     ..
     ..
     if(...){done=true; break;}
  }
share|improve this answer
    
Does not work in for in loops. –  Jonny Sep 12 '13 at 9:58
add comment

If a break is executed from within a set of nested loops, only the innermost loop in which the break is executed is terminated. (Just like standard C)

share|improve this answer
add comment

The break statement breaks out of the innermost loop. An additional test and break statement would be needed to break out of the outer loop.

share|improve this answer
add comment

Change top loop's counter before break

for(i=0; i<10 ; i++)
  for(j=0;j< 10; j++){
     ..
     ..
     i = 10; 
     break;
  }
share|improve this answer
12  
I don't like this too much. The risk is that someone changes the exit condition in one place, and forget the other. –  kotlinski May 14 '09 at 13:18
    
NSUInteger limit = 10; Then: for(i=0; i<limit; i++) { for(j=0; j<10; j++) { .. .. i = limit; break; } } –  Matt Mc Oct 15 '12 at 20:02
    
i = NSIntegerMax? –  Leonard Pauli Aug 14 '13 at 8:02
add comment

Another solution is to factor out the second loop in a function:

int i;

for(i=0; i<10 ; i++){
    if !innerLoop(i) {
        break;
    }
}

bool innerLoop(int i)
    int j;
    for(j=0;j< 10; j++){
        doSomthing(i,j);
        if(endcondtion){
            return false;
        }
    }
}
share|improve this answer
add comment

Exactly like the last ones are, generally like this:

for(i=0;i<a;i++){  
 for(j=0;j<a;j++){
  if(Something_goes_wrong){
   i=a;
   break;
   }
 }
}
share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.