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assume that I have these two classes.Foo and Bar ,Bar extends Foo and implements Serializable

class Foo {

public String name;

public Foo() {
    this.name = "Default";
}

public Foo(String name) {
    this.name = name;
}
}

class Bar extends Foo implements java.io.Serializable {

public int id;

public Bar(String name, int id) {
    super(name);
    this.id = id;
}
}

notice that Foo doesn't implement Serializable .So what happens when I serialize the object Bar

    public static void main(String[] args) throws Exception {

    FileOutputStream fStream=new FileOutputStream("objects.dat");
    ObjectOutputStream oStream=new ObjectOutputStream(fStream);
    Bar bar=new Bar("myName",21);
    oStream.writeObject(bar);

    FileInputStream ifstream = new FileInputStream("objects.dat");
    ObjectInputStream istream = new ObjectInputStream(ifstream);
    Bar bar1 = (Bar) istream.readObject();
    System.out.println(bar1.name + "   " + bar1.id);

} 

it prints "Default 21". the question is ,why java calls the default constructor when the class is not serialized?

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1  
You can't suddenly create instances of an innocent class without calling its constructor, so the serial spec requires calling a constructor of non-serialisable classes. / You might want a serial proxy. –  Tom Hawtin - tackline Dec 26 '11 at 0:45

3 Answers 3

up vote 10 down vote accepted

Serializable is just a "marker interface" for a given class.

But that class must adhere to certain rules:

http://docs.oracle.com/javase/1.5.0/docs/api/java/io/Serializable.html

To allow subtypes of non-serializable classes to be serialized, the subtype may assume responsibility for saving and restoring the state of the supertype's public, protected, and (if accessible) package fields. The subtype may assume this responsibility only if the class it extends has an accessible no-arg constructor to initialize the class's state. It is an error to declare a class Serializable if this is not the case.

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I know that. but why it calls the default constructor.I am not asking what is Serializable ? –  Sleiman Jneidi Dec 25 '11 at 23:35
5  
@sleimanjneidi because "To allow subtypes of non-serializable classes to be serialized, the subtype may assume responsibility for saving and restoring the state of the supertype's public, protected, and (if accessible) package fields". This means Bar should set Foo's name field "by hand", as Foo is not serializable –  fge Dec 25 '11 at 23:38

it may be that the defaultWriteObject can only write the non-static and non-transient fields of the current class. Once the superclass does not implements the Serializable interface, the fields in the superclass can not be serialized into the stream.

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Yes if superclass does not implement Serializable, it will not be serialized, so when deserialized,its default constructor will be called and default values will be allocated to all of its variables. –  akash746 Jan 12 at 18:26

Actually when you will read the parent class object back as it's not serialize at all.. so for the non serialize things again JVM go through the same process as it use to go when we create the new object using new keyword.

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