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I could have sworn I had alength working previously, but I don't quite know what I am doing wrong right now:

user=> (alength '(1 2 3))
IllegalArgumentException No matching method found: alength  clojure.lang.Reflector.invokeMatchingMethod (Reflector.java:79)
user=> (alength [1 2 3])
IllegalArgumentException No matching method found: alength  clojure.lang.Reflector.invokeMatchingMethod (Reflector.java:79)
user=> (doc alength)
-------------------------
clojure.core/alength
([array])
  Returns the length of the Java array. Works on arrays of all
  types.
nil

What should I be doing to get the length of a list/array in Clojure?

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4 Answers 4

up vote 17 down vote accepted

As the docstring says, alength works on Java™ arrays, such as a String[] or Integer[], which is definitely an incompatible type with Clojure lists or vectors, for which you want to use count:

user=> (def x '(1 2 3))
#'user/x
user=> (def xa (to-array x))
#'user/xa
user=> (class x)
clojure.lang.PersistentList
user=> (class xa)
[Ljava.lang.Object;
user=> (alength xa)
3
user=> (alength x) 
java.lang.IllegalArgumentException: No matching method found: alength (NO_SOURCE_FILE:0)
user=> (count x)
3

[Ljava.lang.Object; is the weird way toString is defined to output for native Object arrays.

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5  
Note, that count does also work for arrays. alength is only needed in speed-critical code where you already know that you have an array and need direct access. count would be slower here, because it's more generic. –  kotarak Dec 26 '11 at 16:47

Try using count:

(count '(1 2 3))
(count [1 2 3])
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1  
haha, this is the missing piece ! –  CodeFarmer Apr 7 at 2:11

It should be count.

user=> (count '(1 2 3))
3
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This may be overkill, but you could imitate Common LISP's length function like this:

(def length 
 (fn [lst]
  (loop [i lst cnt 0]
   (cond (empty? i) cnt
     :t (recur (rest i)(inc cnt))))))
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