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So, we have a class that one of its fields is of type abstract class. We want to write a constructor so that there won't be aliasing; i.e. we don't want to reference the Color object that the constructor gets, but to copy it, and assign the copy into our Color field.

class Shape {
    private Color color; /* Color is an abstract class */

    public Shape(Color c) {
       /* How do we assign a clone
          of `c` into `color`? */
    }

    /* Methods */
    ...
}

abstract class Color {
    private String colorModel;
    private float transparency;

    /* Methods */
    ...
}

We cannot use color = c.clone() because the compiler issues the following errors:

  • "Type mismatch: cannot convert from Object to Color."
  • "The method clone() from the type Object is not visible."

So, what is a possible solution for this problem?

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3 Answers 3

1) Color needs to implement Cloneable.

2) Per the Cloneable Javadoc:

By convention, classes that implement this interface should override Object.clone (which is protected) with a public method. See Object.clone() for details on overriding this method.

3) You need to cast the result of c.clone() back to Color (color = (Color)c.clone()) - though your overridden clone() method on Color can do this for you.

Using Cloneable may not be the best approach for this (see the other answers being posted here) - but this should provide what you're asking for.

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Probably is the best way to do it, given how the calling code has to work with arbitrary Color implementations (apparently). The copy constructor would, in turn, be a good way to implement the Coloneable interface (i.e.: return new ColorType(this);) –  user268396 Dec 26 '11 at 2:43

Write a copy constructor in your Color class:

abstract class Color {
    private String colorModel;
    private float transparency;

    public Color(Color c) {
        this.colorModel = c.colorModel;
        this.transparency = c.transparency;
    }
}

I would not recommend clone or Cloneable.

Another idea would be to make Color immutable. You could safely share Color references between Shapes that way; no need to clone or copy that way.

Just in case it's not clear, here's what immutable Color would look like:

public final class Color {
        private final String colorModel;
        private final float transparency;

        public Color(String colorModel, float transparency) {
            this.colorModel = colorModel;
            this.transparency = transparency;
        }

        public String getColorModel() { return this.colorModel; }
        public float getTransparency() { return this.transparency; }
}
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But what about Color's subclasses? if they have other fields, and does not implement a copy constructor? –  Leif Ericson Dec 26 '11 at 2:34
    
Subclasses would have to implement the copy constructor; no different from forcing all subclasses to implement the Cloneable interface. I'd ask why Color has to be abstract. That usually means you have differing behavior. How do you expect different subclasses of Color to behave? –  duffymo Dec 26 '11 at 2:37
    
This is just an example to convey the idea. –  Leif Ericson Dec 26 '11 at 2:39
1  
I know it won't work because it's abstract. That's the whole issue: that I don't know in advance what subclass of this abstract class will be passed. So how can I copy the passed subclass of Color into my class's field? –  Leif Ericson Dec 26 '11 at 2:48
1  
The problem is that Shape has to operate on arbitrary Color. Therefore it cannot know about specific constructors or work with specific method parameters. Therefore the only sane thing to do is specify an interface method which spells out the necessary contract for Shape to be able to work. Therefore copy constructors should be left as an implementation detail, and not exposed implicitly. Unless you are willing to go the reflection route so you can pass down specific types with Class parameters, which would be error prone on top of being overkill and, subjectively, an ugly hack. –  user268396 Dec 26 '11 at 2:51

If you were using java.awt.Color, you could use the following:

this.color = new Color(c.getColorSpace(), c.getColorComponents(), c.getAlpha());

As it is, you will need to define a copy constructor or a clone() method in each concrete subclass of your abstract Color class.

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No you can't because Color is declared abstract and the whole reason of subclassing Color is to get specific Color behaviour. Your own example code bears this out: you refer to methods which might not be available for the specific implementation, such as getAlpha() which is nowhere actually specified in the original question. –  user268396 Dec 26 '11 at 2:46
1  
@user268396 - Oops. I didn't notice that OP was using his own Color class; I was looking at java.awt.Color. :( –  Ted Hopp Dec 26 '11 at 2:56

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