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After reading the article http://jeffkreeftmeijer.com/2011/method-chaining-and-lazy-evaluation-in-ruby/, I started looking for a better solution for method chaining and lazy evaluation.

I think I've encapsulated the core problem with the five specs below; can anyone get them all passing?

Anything goes: subclassing, delegation, meta-programming, but discouraged for the latter.

It would be favourable to keep dependencies to a minimum:

require 'rspec'

class Foo
    # Epic code here
end

describe Foo do

  it 'should return an array corresponding to the reverse of the method chain' do
    # Why the reverse? So that we're forced to evaluate something
    Foo.bar.baz.should == ['baz', 'bar']
    Foo.baz.bar.should == ['bar', 'baz']
  end

  it 'should be able to chain a new method after initial evaluation' do
    foobar = Foo.bar
    foobar.baz.should == ['baz', 'bar']

    foobaz = Foo.baz
    foobaz.bar.should == ['bar', 'baz']
  end

  it 'should not mutate instance data on method calls' do
    foobar = Foo.bar
    foobar.baz
    foobar.baz.should == ['baz', 'bar']
  end

  it 'should behave as an array as much as possible' do
    Foo.bar.baz.map(&:upcase).should == ['BAZ', 'BAR']

    Foo.baz.bar.join.should == 'barbaz'

    Foo.bar.baz.inject do |acc, str|
      acc << acc << str
    end.should == 'bazbazbar'

    # === There will be cake! ===
    # Foo.ancestors.should include Array
    # Foo.new.should == []
    # Foo.new.methods.should_not include 'method_missing'
  end

  it "should be a general solution to the problem I'm hoping to solve" do
    Foo.bar.baz.quux.rab.zab.xuuq.should == ['xuuq', 'zab', 'rab', 'quux', 'baz', 'bar']
    Foo.xuuq.zab.rab.quux.baz.bar.should == ['bar', 'baz', 'quux', 'rab', 'zab', 'xuuq']
    foobarbaz = Foo.bar.baz
    foobarbazquux = foobarbaz.quux
    foobarbazquuxxuuq = foobarbazquux.xuuq
    foobarbazquuxzab = foobarbazquux.zab

    foobarbaz.should == ['baz', 'bar']
    foobarbazquux.should == ['quux', 'baz', 'bar']
    foobarbazquuxxuuq.should == ['xuuq', 'quux', 'baz', 'bar']
    foobarbazquuxzab.should == ['zab', 'quux', 'baz', 'bar']
  end

end
share|improve this question
3  
Why on earth would metaprogramming be discouraged? –  Dave Newton Dec 26 '11 at 4:08
    
The way the Ruby language is designed, I'm pretty sure there is no class that will pass the specs in your first it block and fail the tests in your second it block unless it is really freaky and uses a C extension with some interpreter hooks. The second block is redundant. –  David Grayson Dec 26 '11 at 7:33
    
My only reason for discouraging MP is I'm not a fan of it, albeit a somewhat arbitrary restriction. I'd rather not use it if there's a pragmatic solution that doesn't require it. –  Chris Dec 26 '11 at 10:11

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Trivial, isn't it?

class Foo < Array
  def self.bar
    other = new
    other << 'bar'
    other
  end
  def self.baz
    other = new
    other << 'baz'
    other
  end
  def bar
    other = clone
    other.unshift 'bar'
    other
  end
  def baz
    other = clone
    other.unshift 'baz'
    other
  end
end

The to_s criterion fails because 1.9 has changed the way Array#to_s works. Change to this for compatibility:

Foo.baz.bar.to_s.should == ['bar', 'baz'].to_s

I want cake.

BTW - metaprogramming here would cut down the code size and increase flexibility tremendously:

class Foo < Array
  def self.method_missing(message, *args)
    other = new
    other << message.to_s
    other
  end
  def method_missing(message, *args)
    other = clone
    other.unshift message.to_s
    other
  end
end
share|improve this answer
    
In self.method_missing, you can replace all three lines with simply new 1, message.to_s. –  David Grayson Dec 26 '11 at 6:40
    
I added an extra spec make the problem more general ruling out your initial implementation. The latter still works, but can you get the extra specs passing (method missing)? –  Chris Dec 26 '11 at 10:11
1  
@ChristopherPatuzzo: I am reasonably certain you can't do a general solution without using method_missing, since there is no other mechanism that I am aware of that will catch arbitrary messages. Your dislike aside, this is exactly the thing method_missing is made for. –  Amadan Dec 26 '11 at 13:14
    
Fair enough, if that's the only solution –  Chris Dec 26 '11 at 16:20

This is inspired by Amadan's answer but uses fewer lines of code:

class Foo < Array
    def self.method_missing(message, *args)
        new 1, message.to_s
    end
    def method_missing(message, *args)
        dup.unshift message.to_s
    end
end
share|improve this answer
    
Nice! Learn something new every day... –  Amadan Dec 26 '11 at 13:17

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