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I understand that when you pass by reference through a function in C, the parameters of the function take in the address of the pointer that will be modified. I am extremley boggled on why this example of pass by reference is not working. Can anyone point me in the right direction....

This should output a swap but when i compile the swap does not occur why is this pass by reference not working?

#include <stdio.h>

void swapnum(int *i, int *j) {
    int temp = i;
    i = j;
    j = temp;
}   

int main(void) {
   int a = 10;
   int b = 20;

   swapnum(&a, &b);
   printf("A is %d and B is %d\n", a, b);
   getchar();
   getchar();

 return 0;
}
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2  
If you are using a reasonably modern compiler you should have gotten a warning about int temp = i;. Pay attention to those...they can but you on the right track. –  dmckee Dec 26 '11 at 4:58
    
Thank you everyone for the fast response time! Everyone was very helpful I do understand what the problem was now after reading what everyone wrote. My compiler did warn me, although I thought that I could store the address of a pointer into an int data type. I guess this is incorrect. –  Fred Hotchkin Dec 26 '11 at 5:17
    
We call them pointers in C, but there are things called references in a lot of other languages. –  David Grayson Dec 26 '11 at 7:05
    
So In line 4 of the swapnum() function... i=j, let me understand this correctly, this is a valid line of code correct? What this does if I am correct is it takes the address of j and stores stores it into i. So in my head i points to j. Is this the correct way of thinking about this, if it is why is this only local and no changes are reflected in the main?? –  Fred Hotchkin Dec 26 '11 at 15:32

7 Answers 7

You forgot to dereference your pointers inside the function. Thus you end up reassigning the local pointer values rather than changing the actual value being pointed to and it has no effect.

So, use the * dereference operator:

int temp = *i;
*i = *j;
*j = temp;
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4  
@Fred - note that if you had compiler warnings enabled they'd have picked this up since you were assigning int* i (a pointer) to int temp (not a pointer). Always aim to compile with warnings enabled, it can save endless problems (-Wall -Werror on gcc). –  therefromhere Dec 26 '11 at 4:59

I'm wondering why you didn't get any compiler warning/error. You need to dereference your reference in the function:

void swapnum(int *i, int *j) {
    int temp = *i;
    *i = *j;
    *j = temp;
} 

The reason is i and j inside swapnum() are addresses to original variables when the function is called. So when you use only i or j, you're getting the address of the variable, not the content. Here is an idea of what is going on:

int a = 10;
int b = 20;

        -----------------
0x1000  |  10           |             <-- a
        -----------------
        -----------------
0x1004  |  20           |             <-- b
        -----------------

swapnum(&a, &b);

Then, inside swapnum(int *i, int *j):

        -----------------
0x2000  |  0x1000       |             <-- i (*i == 10)
        -----------------
        -----------------
0x2004  |  0x1004       |             <-- j (*j == 20)
        -----------------
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Thank you very much for the detailed explanation this helps visualize what is going on well. –  Fred Hotchkin Dec 26 '11 at 5:19

In the swapnum function, you are only assigning the variables i and j which are local to this function. This won't have any effect outside of this function. You should try:

void swapnum(int *i, int *j) {
    int temp = *i;
    *i = *j;
    *j = temp;
}
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It's (hopefully) crashing because in this function:

void swapnum(int *i, int *j) {
    int temp = i;
    i = j;
    j = temp;
}

i and j are pointers, and temp is an int. You cannot assign a pointer to an int. If you want to swap the values in i and j do this:

void swapnum(int *i, int *j) {
    int temp = *i;
    *i = *j;
    *j = temp;
}
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You want:

void swapnum(int *i, int *j) {
    int temp = *i;
    *i = *j;
    *j = temp;
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In swapnum, you are swapping the pointers (which are also int values). Try this instead:

void swapnum(int *i, int *j) {
    int temp = *i;
    *i = *j;
    *j = temp;
}
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Pointers are not exactly ints (separate types sine long before the 89 standard), though the compiler will perform the assignment if the sizes are compatible. Most will also issue a warning about it. –  dmckee Dec 26 '11 at 5:01

Your implementation of swapnum() is a bit improper. The function takes 2 (int *) parameters. That is, i and j are integer pointers storing references of a and b. when you do int temp = i; you are actually assigning a pointer to integer variable (which is incorrect) and then instead of swapping the values, the code snippet plays around with addresses. This is what you need

void swapnum(int *i, int *j) {
    int temp = *i;
    *i = *j;
    *j = temp;
}
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