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I have this weird issue in compiling a simple C++ program which throws an exception.

main.cc:

#include <stdio.h>
double mean(double a, double b)
{
    if((a + b) == 0)
    {
        throw "Exception:: Numerator is Zero";
    }
    return (a+b) / 2;`
}

calc.cc:

#include <stdio.h>
double mean(double a, double b)
{
    if((a + b) == 0)
    {
        throw "Exception:: Numerator is Zero";
    }
    return (a+b) / 2;
}

When I compile it as below:

Execute the following commands :
Step 2.1 => gcc -maix64 -fpic -c calc.cc
Step 2.2 => gcc -maix64 -shared -o libcalc.so calc.o -lstdc++
Step 2.3 => gcc -maix64 main.cc libcalc.so -lstdc++

And run the program, Program crashes with the following error :

terminate called after throwing an instance of 'char const*'
IOT/Abort trap (core dumped)

But instead of Step 2.3 , if we use the following commands things are working as expected:

gcc -maix64 main.cc libcalc.so -lstdc++ -lgcc_s

Could you please help in resolving this...

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2  
Can you check your post? Your calc and main are the same. –  Francis Upton Dec 26 '11 at 5:25
1  
Do you mean AIX 7.1? AIX 1.7, if it ever existed, is decades out of date. –  Jonathan Leffler Dec 26 '11 at 5:55
    
it is 1.7 (sorry for the typo)`` –  Anand Kumar Keshri Dec 26 '11 at 5:58
1  
Anand: Still 1.7? Not 7.1? –  Frunsi Dec 26 '11 at 6:24
1  
What happens when you try with the C++ compiler instead of the C compiler? –  Steve C Dec 26 '11 at 15:24
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1 Answer

You provided the answer in the question, I think. This question helped me solve a similar problem. We have a particular C binary which was being linked to a shared object compiled with g++ and capable of throwing exceptions. The exceptions are always caught in the library. In order to link this on AIX you have to specify all of the dependent libraries on the link line. So I added -lstdc++. This allowed everything to compile, but the runtime tests would crash as soon as an exception was thrown in the shared object. Adding -lgcc_s fixed this because gcc_s is where all the exception handling code lives.

As Steve C commented, the alternative is to just compile the .c file with g++ and then all of this is handled. Our build system always calls gcc for .c files and that was painful for me to change so I just added -lstdc++ and -lgcc_s and everything works including all the runtime tests.

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