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With this "|" delimited file: dummy.dat

sid|storeNo|latitude|longitude
2|1|-28.03720000
9|2
10
jgn352|1|-28.03720000
9|2|fdjkjhn422-405
0000543210|gfdjk39

For example the value "-28.03720000" in the latitude field appears twice, then in the output it will appear once but have at the end of it(2). Another example, the value "2" appeared once in the sid field but twice in the storeno field - so for output it will have one entry under the sid field (with "(1)" at the end) and one entry under the storeno field (with "(2)" at the end).

Desired result:

sid|storeNo|latitude|longitude
9(2)|1(2)|-28.03720000(2)
0000543210(1)|2(2)|fdjkjhn422-405(1)
10(1)|gfdjk39(1)    
2(1)
jgn352(1)

Another example of acceptable desired result (given the same input file):

sid|storeNo|latitude|longitude
9(2)|2(2)|-28.03720000(2)
jgn352(1)|1(2)|fdjkjhn422-405(1)
10(1)|gfdjk39(1)    
0000543210(1)
2(1)

What is the generic solution to produce such output as above? I am open to awk, bash, perl.etc It is the distinct values of each field (with the count of the occurences of that value in "()" and then ordered desc by those count of occurrences):

Have found these 2 code snippets that get the general idea but just in a different output format:

Script 1:
awk -F"|" ' {
                for( i = 1; i <= NF; i++ )
                {
                        count[i " " $(i)]++;    # count by field number and field value
                        uniq[$(i)] = 1;         # save a list of unique strings
                }
                if( NF > fields )
                        fields = NF;            # in case a variable number in file; capture max
        }
        END {
                for( i = 1; i <= fields; i++ )
                {
                        printf( "field %d\n", i );
                        for( x in uniq )
                                if( count[i " " x] )
                                        printf( "%s (%d)\n", x, count[i " " x] );  # print by field and value
                        printf( "\n" );
                }
        } ' dummy.dat

Script 2:
awk -F"|" '{for (i=1;i<=NF;i++) a[i FS $i]++} END {for (i in a) print i,"(",a[i],")" |"sort -n" } ' dummy.dat
share|improve this question
1  
Can you please explain the relationship between the input and desired output? It is not very intuitive –  SiegeX Dec 26 '11 at 6:08
    
very confusing format - what determines which row an entry shows up in? –  kfmfe04 Dec 26 '11 at 6:10
    
@SiegeX - The desired output will have for each field in the input: the distinct values for that field (and the number of times that value appeared in the field). kfmfe04 - It does not matter which row an entry in the desired output appears. You can think of the output as the distinct values of each field just stuck together into one file. –  toop Dec 26 '11 at 6:17
2  
@toop What determines what goes on the same row in the output? For example, why is 9,1,-28.03720000 and longitude on the same row but others not? –  SiegeX Dec 26 '11 at 6:28
1  
I looked at this cheat sheet here and thought may be that could cause issue. :) –  jaypal Dec 26 '11 at 8:26
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1 Answer

up vote 2 down vote accepted
awk -F'|' '

FNR==NR{
  if(FNR>1)
    for(i=1;i<=NF;i++)
      a[$i,i]++
  next
}
FNR==1{print}
FNR>1{
  for(j=1;j<=NF;j++)
    if(b[$j,j]++)
      printf("|")
    else
      printf("%s(%s)|",$j,a[$j,j])
  print ""
}' ./dummy.dat ./dummy.dat | sed 's/|*$//'

Output

sid|storeNo|latitude|longitude
2(1)|1(2)|-28.03720000(2)
9(2)|2(2)
10(1)
jgn352(1)
||fdjkjhn422-405(1)
0000543210(1)|gfdjk39(1)

Note: Getting rid of the trailing | is going to take some extra work. Hopefully this will suffice.
I just passed the final output to sed 's/|*$//'

share|improve this answer
    
Given the wicked desired output, this is sight for sore eyes!! +1 –  jaypal Dec 26 '11 at 7:30
    
This gives me: awk: syntax error near line 4...10..11 awk: illegal statement near line 4...10..11 –  toop Dec 26 '11 at 7:45
    
@toop Perhaps FNR is a gawkism. HERE is an example of it working with gawk. Note I had to use process substitution for the input because ideone doesn't allow you to create files. –  SiegeX Dec 26 '11 at 7:55
1  
@loop try using nawk, I am not sure if solaris awk has support for FNR built-in variable. –  jaypal Dec 26 '11 at 7:58
    
@SiegeX - Appears to have a bug because fdjkjhn422-405(1) is not in the sid column. –  toop Dec 26 '11 at 8:00
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