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I recently switched to ARC for my app project. I'm using iOS 5 SDK. Running one iPod 4g device I don't get any warnings. But trying to run my app on iPod 2g I get many warnings:

*** __NSAutoreleaseNoPool(): Object 0x258070 of class DataModel autoreleased with no pool in place - just leaking
*** __NSAutoreleaseNoPool(): Object 0x2530a0 of class __NSArrayM autoreleased with no pool in place - just leaking
*** __NSAutoreleaseNoPool(): Object 0x25a2e0 of class NSCFNumber autoreleased with no pool in place - just leaking

I guess there's difference between running arm6/arm7 code by using ARC.

How to fix this ? Thanks

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1 Answer 1

up vote 5 down vote accepted

Wherever you are doing stuff on a separate thread, it'd be smart to add @autoreleasepool contexts.

More information available here.

There's also some decent examples to be found in this related question.

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After I switched app to ARC, I removed all autorelease pools. I have just one autorelease pool in main.m file. For ARC code I think there's not any requirement to use autorelease pools. Does i'm right ? –  kesrut Dec 26 '11 at 12:17
    
So I need convert all NSAutoreleasePool constructions to @autoreleasepool ? That's bad because i removed all NSAutoreleasePool constructions from my code ... –  kesrut Dec 26 '11 at 12:29
    
Nope. You still need to keep things in @autoreleasepool contexts (or NSAutoreleasePool should work fine as well... the newer form I think came in with ARC but they should be equivalent, IMO). This related question is rather wordy, but it should provide some more technical detail. –  Michael Dautermann Dec 26 '11 at 12:30
    
@kesrut - That's a good reason to start using version control. –  Abizern Dec 26 '11 at 13:01
    
@kesrut - As Michael states, anything run on a background thread still needs to be wrapped in an @autoreleasepool, because only the main thread has an autorelease pool by default. Otherwise, you leak autoreleased objects, as the error indicates. The one exception to this is that blocks in GCD do not require explicit autorelease pools, which is another good reason to use GCD instead of manual threads. –  Brad Larson Dec 26 '11 at 19:11
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