Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

I have a struct as follows:

struct Node{
int *arr;
int *sol;
struct Node *Next;
};

i am creating Node in this way:

Node* MyNode = (Node *)malloc(sizeof (struct Node));
MyNode->arr = malloc(sizeof(int)*N);
MyNode->sol=  malloc(sizeof(int)*N);

I then add MyNode to a linked list. How can i free memory for an element in the list.
is this correct:

pop(){
   free(first->arr);
   free(first->sol);
   first=first->Next; 
}
share|improve this question
1  
Show us the real code. – Alok Save Dec 26 '11 at 12:16
    
Which language? Also: there is a ; missing from your struct definition (for both languages). – wildplasser Dec 26 '11 at 12:16
1  
What's Next? Your Node doesn't contain a Next pointer. – Mike Dunlavey Dec 26 '11 at 12:17
    
In C don't cast the return value of malloc. In C the type Node (for the pointer MyNode) doesn't exist. In C use a C compiler for C code :) – pmg Dec 26 '11 at 12:18
up vote 4 down vote accepted

For any struct to be a node in a linked-list, you need a self-referential structure variable which should be declared as struct Node *next;

struct Node{
    int *arr;
    int *sol;
    struct Node *next;
}

To allocate memory for a node of a linked-list, you need the following:

/* allocate memory for a node */
struct Node * MyNode = (struct Node *)malloc((int)sizeof(struct Node));
if (MyNode == NULL) {
    printf("ERROR: unable to allocate memory \n");
    return 1;
}

/* allocate memory for the content of a node */
MyNode->arr = (int *) malloc((int)sizeof(int) * N);
if (MyNode->arr == NULL) {
    printf("ERROR: unable to allocate memory \n");
    return 1;
}

MyNode->sol = (int *) malloc((int)sizeof(int) * N);
if (MyNode->sol == NULL) {
    printf("ERROR: unable to allocate memory \n");
    return 1;
}

/* add the new node to a list by updating the next variable */
MyNode->next = ... 

If you are not sure about the operations that you need to perform to delete node in a linked-list, you can use a temp variable to do the same in an easier way.

pop()
{
    struct Node * temp = first;
    first = first->next;
    free(temp->arr);
    free(temp->sol);
    free(temp);
}

Thumb rule for free - for every malloc() there should be a free()

OTOH, to go through various scenarios in deleting a node in an linked-list, please refer this link.

share|improve this answer

almost, you need to free the node itself:

pop(){
   Node* old_first = first;
   free(first->arr);
   free(first->sol);
   first=first->Next;
   free(old_first); 
}
share|improve this answer
    
nitpick old_first is not declared,there is a compilation error in your answer :) – Alok Save Dec 26 '11 at 12:23
    
true........... – Roee Gavirel Dec 26 '11 at 12:25
pop(){
   free(first->arr);
   free(first->sol);
   Node* temp = first; //<========
   first=first->Next;
   free (temp);  //<=======
}
share|improve this answer
    
you can't do first=first->next after free(first) ... – Roee Gavirel Dec 26 '11 at 12:17
    
@Mat, Roee, give me 20 seconds will you?! – Armen Tsirunyan Dec 26 '11 at 12:18
    
yeah, you right (-: – Roee Gavirel Dec 26 '11 at 12:20

It's close but not correct - you should have as many frees as you have mallocs. You're forgetting to free the Node itself.

To fix it, add a temporary:

Node *next = first->next;
free(first->arr);
free(first->sol);
free(first); 
first = next;
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.