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Is there any possiblty to swap three numbers in a single statement

Eg :

  • a = 10
  • b = 20
  • c = 30

I want values to be changed as per the following list

a = 20
b = 30
c = 10

Can these values be transferred in a single line?

share|improve this question
    
Is this an interview question? –  Sergio Tulentsev Dec 26 '11 at 12:18
10  
Do the recruiters get the best professionals with this kind of questions? Incredible –  Tio Pepe Dec 26 '11 at 12:40
16  
this is a stupid interview question.. –  Nils Pipenbrinck Dec 26 '11 at 12:40
1  
how can we still be asked this kind of question ? i hope for you that the recruiter does not make use of that kind of tricks into his code. if he does, fly away as fast as posible: it is 1. unreadable, 2. a nightmare to maintain, 3. slow, 4. not saving any space at all (the space saved by the missing 3 temporary variables is eaten by the additional code required). –  Adrien Plisson Dec 26 '11 at 12:47
1  
You could well be missing the point of the question - not every question is meant to be answered literally as asked. It may well be to test a candidate's judgement and interpersonal skills when being handed a poorly thought out task. –  brettdj Dec 26 '11 at 13:03

8 Answers 8

up vote 1 down vote accepted

I found another solution for this question.

You can use this in many languages like C,C++ and Java.

It will work for float and long also.

a=(a+b+c) - (b=c) - (c=a);
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Try Different scenario: Eg :

a = 10
b = 20
c = 30

a= a+b+c;
b=a-b-c;
c=a-b-c;
a=a-b-c;

For n number's,

a = 10
b = 20
c = 30
.
.
.
n


a= a+b+c+......+n;
b=a-b-c-.......-n;
c=a-b-c-.......-n;
.
.
.
n=a-b-c-.......-n;
a=a-b-c-.......-n;
share|improve this answer

This is a silly question. But here is the only answer (so far) that is both well-defined C and truly a single line:

a ^= b, b ^= a, a ^= b, b ^= c, c ^= b, b ^= c;

Uses the XOR swap algorithm, correctly.

Note: This assumes that a, b and c are all of the same integer type (the question doesn't specify).

share|improve this answer
    
double a = 10; char b = 20; int c = 30; hehehe –  pmg Dec 26 '11 at 13:41
    
@pmg: Ah, that's a fair point. The OP didn't specify that they were all of the same type. –  Oliver Charlesworth Dec 26 '11 at 13:42
    
Downvoters: care to comment? –  Oliver Charlesworth Dec 26 '11 at 14:58
3  
int a = 10, b = 10, c = 10; –  Alok Singhal Dec 26 '11 at 18:22
    
@Alok: Ah, good point. I would delete the answer, except I can't, because it's already been accepted. –  Oliver Charlesworth Dec 26 '11 at 20:21

Solution in C#. Using xor swap a and b first. The result of the assignment is the assigned value, in this case b is the leftmost variable so it is return as a result of (b ^= a ^ (a ^= b ^= a)). Then swap c and the b using the same algorithm. :)

            int a = 10;
            int b = 20;
            int c = 30;
            c ^= (b ^= a ^ (a ^= b ^= a)) ^ (b ^= c ^= b);
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1  
that's obviously not ruby... nor python either... there is only one kind of language flawed enough to allow assignment inside an expression: C or one of its (equally flawed) derivative. –  Adrien Plisson Dec 26 '11 at 12:34
1  
I figured that, yes :-) But since ruby has the same operation, I tried it there. (b ^= (a ^= (b ^= a))) ^= c, what will be the result of left part? My feeling tells me it's value, not variable. –  Sergio Tulentsev Dec 26 '11 at 12:38
1  
it was a broken c# :) I have fixed in now –  Pencho Ilchev Dec 26 '11 at 12:38
2  
-1: The OP asked for C. In C, this is undefined behaviour. –  Oliver Charlesworth Dec 26 '11 at 12:59
1  
@OliCharlesworth The question was tagged as C after almost everyone here suggested an answer. See the question comments. Language was not specified. –  Pencho Ilchev Dec 26 '11 at 13:22

Make use of the comma operator ...

a = 10;
b = 20;
c = 30;
/* one statement */
tmp = a, a = b, b = c, c = tmp; /* assumes tmp has been declared */
assert(a == 20);
assert(b == 30);
assert(c == 10);
share|improve this answer
1  
+1: Only correct answer so far. But for a truly grim answer, you could combine comma operator with XOR swap, to eliminate tmp. a ^= b, b ^= a, a ^= b, b ^= c, c ^= b, b ^= c;... –  Oliver Charlesworth Dec 26 '11 at 13:03
    
Assumes ! what if not declared ! that will make your code 2 lines (in some programming languages) not single , and question is clear you have these 3 numbers ! to swap in 3 variables. –  Al-Mothafar Dec 26 '11 at 13:25
    
@Al-Mothafar: nevertheless it works with these definitions: int a = 10; double b = 20; char c = 30; and the declaration float tmp;. No other suggestion does it. –  pmg Dec 26 '11 at 13:29

Um, I like these logic things, my solution:

a= b+c-((b=c)+(c=a))+c;

BTW: I tested that (Actually using JS) and working with any numbers :)

Edit:

I tested with negative & decimals and working too :)

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3  
-1: Unspecified Behaviour ... the sub-expression evaluation order is not specified. –  pmg Dec 26 '11 at 13:08
    
@pmg Ha ! what you mean !! –  Al-Mothafar Dec 26 '11 at 13:12
    
The compiler can choose to do the sub-expressions in any order it likes: for example it can do (c=a) before (b=c) which would make b get assigned the value in a. –  pmg Dec 26 '11 at 13:16
3  
OK, tagged with C after edit, and I put my answer before that edit ! So You cant be hurry and put your rude comments like YaY I'm Genius and you all stupids ! –  Al-Mothafar Dec 26 '11 at 13:40
4  
I don't think my comment is a rude comment. It simply states that I found the answer not useful (by the -1) and a fact (unspecified behaviour) to somehow justify the unusefulness and maybe make it a better answer overall. –  pmg Dec 26 '11 at 14:17
$ python
>>> a, b, c = 10, 20, 30
>>> print a, b, c
10 20 30
>>> a, b, c = b, c, a
>>> print a, b, c
20 30 10
share|improve this answer
    
OP asked for C... –  Oliver Charlesworth Dec 26 '11 at 13:25
4  
There was no C in the original tag list. –  Sergio Tulentsev Dec 26 '11 at 13:32
    
@Sergei: Indeed. But there is now. Perhaps the answer should be deleted now the question has been clarified? –  Oliver Charlesworth Dec 26 '11 at 13:40

Since you didn't specify the language, I will pick one of my choice. It's Ruby.

sergio@soviet-russia$ irb
1.9.3p0 :001 > a = 10
 => 10 
1.9.3p0 :002 > b = 20
 => 20 
1.9.3p0 :003 > c = 30
 => 30 
1.9.3p0 :004 > a, b, c = b, c, a # <== transfer is happening here
 => [20, 30, 10] 
1.9.3p0 :005 > a
 => 20 
1.9.3p0 :006 > b
 => 30 
1.9.3p0 :007 > c
 => 10
share|improve this answer
    
OP asked for C... –  Oliver Charlesworth Dec 26 '11 at 13:25
2  
There was no C in the original tag list. –  Sergio Tulentsev Dec 26 '11 at 13:32
    
Indeed. But there is now. Perhaps the answer should be deleted now the question has been clarified? –  Oliver Charlesworth Dec 26 '11 at 13:40

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