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I have a string object of the general form string line = "yadayada\nyadaya". I loop through the string as below trying to "catch" the newline character.

        for (int i = 1; i < line.length(); i++)
        {
             if ( ( line[i]== ' \ ') && ( line[i+1] == 'n' ) ) 
             {
                  buffer.insertChar('\n');
                  i = i+2;
             }
             else
             {

                  buffer.insertChar(line[i]);
             }

        }

As you can see i loop through the string characters and i am inserting the characters one by one in another object called buffer (irrelevant to the question).

In the first if if ( ( line[i]== ' \ ') && ( line[i+1] == 'n' ) ) i am trying to "catch" the newline character and inside that if body i am incrementing the index i by two so that it will skip the characters '\' and 'n' in the next loop. The problem is that this loop never catches a newline character but always inserts in the buffer the two individual characters '\' and 'n' .

Important Note: I start the loop with index i = 1 because the first character acts like a command and is being treated specially.

Update: I modified the above code but still no luck with what i am trying to accomplish

                for (int i = 1; i < line.length(); i++)
                {
                    if ( (line[i]== '\n') )   
                    {

                        buffer.insertChar('\n');
                        i = i+1;
                    }
                    else
                    {

                        buffer.insertChar(line[i]);
                    }

                }

Update # 2 : If that helps the string is being originated from input of the user like below:

string line;
getline(cin,line);
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the second code is wrong. Why do you do i = i+1? And even then, you are simply just copying the contents of the string to buffer? –  Jiri Pik Dec 26 '11 at 14:15

6 Answers 6

"\n" is not a string containing a \ followed by an n. The escape sequence \n denotes a single character, which you can look for with

for (size_t i = 0; i < line.length(); i++)
     if (line[i] == '\n')
         // whatever

or with good old std::string::find.

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Instead of ( line[i]== ' \ ') && ( line[i+1] == 'n' ), try

if ( line[i]== '\n')

and

i = i+1;

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'\n' is one char, not two.

try:

if (line[i] == '\n') ...
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I'm not sure if you're searching for the sequence of character '\' plus 'n' or the newline (whose representation in a C source file is indeed \n, but that corresponds to a single byte!), but in both cases, this should be ok:

#include <iostream>
#include <string>
using namespace std;

int main() {
    string pattern("\n");      //or, "\\n", so \n is actually '\' plus 'n'
    string input="yadayada\nyayda\\nyadayada";
    size_t index;
    while((index=input.find_first_of(pattern))!=string::npos)
        input=input.substr(0, index)+input.substr(index+pattern.size());
    cout<<input;
}

This example prints yadayadayayda\nyadayada, which is probably what you want.

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Isn't a string(object) a sequence of random characters ? Are there any special sequences in the strings like \n ?? Basically i am trying to match the sequence of the '/' character followed by the 'n' character and if i find that sequence then this is a signal that i must insert a newline character in another buffer object (irrelevant ,not so important in the question) . –  Vaios Argiropoulos Dec 26 '11 at 13:37
    
string foo("string literal"); and string foo="string literal"; when creating foo do practically the same thing (in fact I didn't even notice that I used the first form for pattern and the second for input). Please be consistent, it's rather hard to understand what you're trying to do: in your question you talk about \n or '\' plus 'n', in the comment you talk instead of '/': the latter has no special meaning, it's a character as any other, '\' instead is an escape character, so it does have a special meaning: link. –  Lorenzo Pistone Dec 26 '11 at 14:08

In string line = "yadayada\nyadaya", there is one character between "yadayada" and "yadaya". Did you mean "yadayada\\nyadaya", which you are trying to convert to "yadayada\nyadaya"?

' \ ' should be '\\'. I'm guessing you tried '\', got a compiler error, and figured you'd try adding some characters until it compiled? That's a bad idea. ' \ ', if it's accepted by the compiler at all, will never match.

There's also one more problem: i = i+2; increases i by 2, but you then go to the i++, so you increase i by a total of 3.

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There are a couple of problems with the code:

  1. if you assume that '\' and 'n' are two different characters, if the '\' is at the end of the code, you would run out of the array! you need to put to the if condition if the i<n-1

  2. '\' and 'n' are usually one character, so you do test line[i] == '\n'.

  3. Your i=i+2 is wrong as you always increment by 1 by the for loop itself, so just i++ in the condition is fine

More fundamentally, what are you actually trying to achieve? Are you just trying to remove \n from the string? Why not to use standard string replace functions!!!!

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