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When I run

rails g model StripeCustomer user_id:integer customer_id:integer
annotate

I got

# == Schema Information
# Table name: stripe_customers
#  id          :integer(4)      not null, primary key
#  user_id     :integer(4)
#  customer_id :integer(4)
#  created_at  :datetime
#  updated_at  :datetime

Does it mean I can only hold up to 9,999 records only? (I am quite surprise how small a default size for keys is). How do I change default IDs to be 7 digits in existing tables?

Thank you.

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2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

While the mysql client's describe command really uses the display width (see the docs), the schema information in the OP's question is very probably generated by the annontate_models gem's get_schema_info method that uses the limit attribute of each column. And the limit attribute is the number of bytes for :binary and :integer columns (see the docs).

The method reads (see how the last line adds the limit):

def get_schema_info(klass, header, options = {})
  info = "# #{header}\n#\n"
  info << "# Table name: #{klass.table_name}\n#\n"

  max_size = klass.column_names.collect{|name| name.size}.max + 1
  klass.columns.each do |col|
    attrs = []
    attrs << "default(#{quote(col.default)})" unless col.default.nil?
    attrs << "not null" unless col.null
    attrs << "primary key" if col.name == klass.primary_key

    col_type = col.type.to_s
    if col_type == "decimal"
      col_type << "(#{col.precision}, #{col.scale})"
    else
      col_type << "(#{col.limit})" if col.limit
    end

    #...        
end
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Rails actually means 4 bytes here, i.e. the standard mysql integer type (see the docs)

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you're right. I edited my answer accordingly. –  maprihoda Dec 26 '11 at 18:53

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