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In 'Programming in Scala, Second Edition' at page 410 you can find class Simulation which have the following method:

private def next() {
  (agenda: @unchecked) match {
    case item :: rest =>
      agenda = rest
      curtime = item.time
      item.action()
  }
}

I'm curious why Odersky implemented this with pattern matching rather than just like that:

private def next() {
  val item = agenda.head
  agenda = agenda.tail
  curtime = item.time
  item.action()
}

Is pattern matching so efficient that it doesn't matter at all? Or it was just not so perfect example?

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3 Answers

up vote 9 down vote accepted

Normally I'd write it the way you did. (Even though pattern matching is quite efficient, it is not as efficient as head/tail.) You'd use pattern matching if

  1. You wanted to practice pattern matching
  2. You wanted a MatchException instead of a NoSuchElementException
  3. You were going to fill in other cases later.
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There are a couple reasons:

  1. Part of the point of the book is to get you thinking in Scala (functional) terms; pattern matching is the functional-programming equivalent.

  2. Pattern matching and the functional approach are the natural pattern in Scala, and allow things like concurrency in a natural way; learn that pattern and your Scala programs will be ready for more advanced uses.

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Pattern matching is more idiomatic in Scala, and more easily protects you from boundary conditions.

In the code

private def next() {
  val item = agenda.head
  agenda = agenda.tail
  curtime = item.time
  item.action()
}

Both agenda.head and agenda.tail will throw a NoSuchElementException exception if agenda is an empty list, so to make it actually work you need to add a check for that.

The pattern matching version actually has a similar issue (as noted in th comments), but I find the fix cleaner, as all you have to do is add another pattern:

private def next() {
  (agenda: @unchecked) match {
    case item :: rest =>
      agenda = rest
      curtime = item.time
      item.action()
    case _ => {}
  }
}
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the pattern matching version will throw MatchException if the pattern don't match –  gerferra Dec 26 '11 at 19:43
    
@gerferra: I stand corrected. But the pattern matching version at any rate has a simple fix. I'll update the answer. –  Don Roby Dec 26 '11 at 20:01
3  
The other version also has a simple fix: either wrap in if (!agenda.isEmpty), or use agenda.headOption.foreach{ item => agenda = agenda.tail; curtime = item.time; item.action() } –  Rex Kerr Dec 26 '11 at 22:47
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