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I'm new to Jquery... I'm trying to have a simple system as shown below...

http://jsfiddle.net/z7PaJ/

I want to have all visible elements fade out, and then the appropriate elements fade in based on what is selected. I managed to get around using if/else logic about what is visible by just blanketing the script with fadeIn and fadeOut, so Jquery will decide for itself what is visible (maybe this is a problem?). BUT the biggest issue is that elements start fading in before everything has faded out. In other words, an element will decide its visible before all of the other elements have been hidden.

I can tell I need to use callbacks, but every test I've done has only made the situation more comlicated... here is the most basic example.

Thanks!

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What exactly you want? Something like this? –  Ronak Dec 26 '11 at 19:04
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3 Answers

up vote 0 down vote accepted

Here's another version:

 $("#all").addClass("highlight");

 $("#all, #m1, #m2, #m3").mouseover(function(){
    $("*").removeClass("highlight");
    $(this).addClass("highlight");
    var elm = 'n'+$(this).attr('id').substr(1);
    elm = elm=='nll' ? elm='ul li' : elm = $('.'+elm);
    $("ul li:visible").stop(true, true).fadeOut("slow", function() {
         $(elm).fadeIn("slow");
    });
});

Also with a modified fiddle: http://jsfiddle.net/adeneo/z7PaJ/23/

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This is great! Exactly the type of use I envision... BUT it seems looks like the script depends on the codes being named with numeric values... its more practical for the css to have 'real' names... like '#apple, #banana, #orange, instead of #1, #2, #3. I'm trying to figure out how I can make it work with this in mind, but is there something easy i'm missing? Thanks!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! –  user962642 Dec 26 '11 at 23:49
    
@user962642 Numbers should not be used as the first 'letter' in a class or ID, as it could cause trouble, especially in older doctypes like XHTML 1.0. So I just added a 'm' to the ID's, and because I normally don't like to use the same names for ID's and classes as it's easy to forget or confuse such names I added a 'n' to the classes and used 'substr' to remove one letter and then replaced it with another. However there is nothing really wrong with using same name for ID and class, and here's a FIDDLE that does that, and it's probably easier to read. –  adeneo Dec 27 '11 at 8:02
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You'll want to fadeIn after the fadeOut has completed. You can do it with a callback as such:

$(".1").fadeOut(function(){
    $(".1").fadeIn();
});
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You will want to use an animation completion callback to start one animation after the first one finishes. And, here's a much more compact way (with comments) to do this that avoids all your repeated code and uses the completion callback:

$(document).ready(function(){
    $("#masters span").mouseover(function() {
        // stop any existing animations and jump to ending state 
        // and save jQuery object for later use
        var items$ = $(".items li").stop(true, true);

        // highlight the current item only
        $("#masters span").removeClass("highlight");
        $(this).addClass("highlight");

        // check if we're on the "all" item
        if (this.id == "all") {
            items$.fadeIn("slow");
        } else {
            // fade out any items that are not already hidden and not our target
            // we eliminate items that are already hidden 
            //     so the callback won't fire immediately
            // visible target is elements with a class name that matches 
            //     the current element's id
            var target$ = $("." + this.id);
            var once = false;
            items$.not(target$).not(":hidden").fadeOut("slow", function() {
                // the callback will fire for each item that is animating
                // and we only want to start the fadeIn once
                // so we have a flag for making sure we only start it once
                if (!once) {
                    target$.fadeIn("slow");
                }
                once = true;
            });
        }
    });
});  

Or the compact version without comments:

$(document).ready(function(){
    $("#masters span").mouseover(function() {
        var items$ = $(".items li").stop(true, true);
        $("#masters span").removeClass("highlight");
        $(this).addClass("highlight");
        if (this.id == "all") {
            items$.fadeIn("slow");
        } else {
            var target$ = $("." + this.id);
            var once = false;
            items$.not(target$).not(":hidden").fadeOut("slow", function() {
                if (!once) {target$.fadeIn("slow");}
                once = true;
            });
        }
    });
});  

See the modified jsFiddle for a few changes to IDs and classnames that go with this code and to see it working. I use a scheme where the id of the object that the mouse hovers over determines the class name of the items to show. This allows a single piece of code to work for all the items without having to repeat the same code over and over again.

Note: For best cross-browser compatibility, IDs and class names should not start with a digit.

Note: this version uses a few extra lines of code to keep there from being any flash when you mouseout and back into the same item.

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