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So I got into a friendly argument with a co-worker over a piece of code:

public sealed class NewObject
{
    private string _stuff = string.Empty;

    public string Stuff
    {
        get { return GetAllStuff(); }
    }

    private string GetAllStuff()
    {
        //Heavy string manipulation of _stuff
    }

    public NewObject(string stuffToStartWith)
    {
        _stuff = stuffToStartWith;
    }

    public static NewObject operator +(NewObject obj1, NewObject obj2)
    {
        if (obj1 == null)
            throw new ArgumentNullException();

        if (obj2 == null)
            throw new ArgumentNullException();

        NewObject result = new NewObject(string.Empty);
        result._stuff = String.Concat(obj1._stuff, obj2._stuff);

        return result;
    }
}

The argument was over the operator override. My co-worker feels that it's not best programming practice to set values of private fields anywhere but the constructor. The solution proposed by my co-worker was to refactor the name of the Stuff property to AllStuff and add a property, Stuff, that has a get AND set accessor and use the new Stuff property in the operator override. Making it look like this:

    public static NewObject operator +(NewObject obj1, NewObject obj2)
    {
        if (obj1 == null)
            throw new ArgumentNullException();

        if (obj2 == null)
            throw new ArgumentNullException();

        NewObject result = new NewObject(string.Empty);
        result.Stuff = String.Concat(obj1.Stuff, obj2.Stuff);

        return result;
    }

I disagree. I feel the first way is better since it keeps the property read-only outside the class. My question is, which way is the best practice for object-oriented design?

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5 Answers 5

up vote 5 down vote accepted

You could give yourself a private set on the property (which would retain visibility or lack thereof while allowing you to use property syntax), but that doesn't really address the point.

Within the class, I say that variables are fair game. Anywhere outside, including inherited classes, should get and set the property, but within the declaring class I say it's OK to assign the private member.

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You're right

err... to elaborate, your private variables are yours to do as you please. If someone does an operation on you that changes the value of the object, (especially something like +), theres nothing wrong with modifying the value outside of the constructor. Thats the whole point of them being private.

Unless you want it immutable...

Update
The more i think about it, the more I believe your co-worker is confusing 'private' variables with 'constant' ones - or perhaps merging the two concepts. There is no reason that private variables have to remain the same throughout the life of the object, which is what your friend seems to be implying. const is for unchanging, private is for the object only, they are two very distinct patterns.

Update2
Also, his design falls apart if suddenly your object has more than just a string - and the variables are intertwined (think of a string object, that has a char* and a len, and must be maintained together). The last thing you want is for the user to have to deal with internal variables of an object. Let the object be an object and maintain its own internal values and present a single entity to the user.

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@cyber: I think this is more a matter of the OP not being entirely clear. It sounded to me like his coworker was advocating not changing a private variable directly outside of the constructor or the property implementation. I don't think he was advocating keeping the values the same for the life of the object. –  Adam Robinson May 14 '09 at 16:28

The general issue has to do with a contract policy.

The notion of a (public set) property is that when it is called, other actions may be taken in addition to the semantic notion of changing state. For example, calling a setter may fire events, trigger a peripheral device and so on.

Your coworker is saying that by not using the property, you're side-stepping the contract and no events will be fired.

So here's you should do from your coworker's point of view:

this.Prop = CalculateSomeValue();
if (this.Prop < kPropMin) {
    this.Prop = kPropMin;
}
else if (this.Prop > kPropMax * 2) {
    this.Prop = kPropMax * 2;
}
this.Prop = this.Prop / 2;

Now, this is a contrived case, but I've just hit a possible heavyweight property up to three times in the get and up to three times in the set, and one of those might be illegal (setting to kHighLimit / 2). I can work around this by using a local and calling the set precisely once at the end. I'd rather just mess with the field, though.

I think a better approach is to take it pragmatically: use the property inside your class if and only if you want to invoke all the side-effects of a set or a get, otherwise obey the spirit of the property instead.

-- clarification -- By obey the spirit of the property, let's say that my set property looks like this:

bool PropValueOutOfRange(int val) {
    return val < kPropMin || val > kPropMax;
}

public int Prop {
    set {
        if (PropValueOutOfRange(value))
            throw new ArgumentOutOfRangeException("value");
        if (PropValueConflictsWithInternalState(value))
            throw new ArgumentException("value");
        _prop = value;
        NotifyPeriperalOfPropChange(_prop);
        FirePropChangedEvent(/* whatever args might be needed */);
    }
}

In this I've factored out a lot of the grungy details, but that lets me reuse them. So now I feel confident in touching the private field _prop because I have the same infrastructure for making sure that I keep it in range and to notify the peripheral and fire the event.

This lets me write this code:

_prop = CalculateSomeValue();

if (_prop < kPropMin)
    _prop = kPropMin;
else if (_prop > kPropMax * 2)
    _prop = kPropMax;

_prop /= 2;

NotifyPeripheralOfPropChange();
FirePropChangedEvent();

I'm using the same tools as those used to build the property so I'm working within the spirit of the property. I maintain correct range (but don't throw - I know better, I'm the implementer), hit the peripheral and fire events, and I do it thoughtfully, readably, and efficiently - not indiscriminately.

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+1 because after reading this I think this is probably my co-worker's thought process. However for the purpose of the code being disputed the property should never be changed outside the class for any reason. –  Alexander Kahoun May 14 '09 at 15:51
    
Question: In your pragmatic approach, when you say to 'obey the spirit of the property' do you mean that if the property should never change outside the class then use the field to update as I am doing above? –  Alexander Kahoun May 14 '09 at 16:06

I don't see what the benefit of his approach would be.

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I personaly prefer to have no fields at all, hence I use auto-implemented private properties instead of private fields and public-get private-set properties if want to have public read-only properties.
If I have to add code to the property, I still only use the field inside of the property accessors and use the getters and setters everywhere else including the constructor.
I have to use fields, too, if I need readonly fields, but C# 4.0 will introduce read-only properties.


Further I would have avoided the whole problem by using the following code.

public static NewObject operator +(NewObject obj1, NewObject obj2)
{
    return new NewObject(String.Concat(obj1.Stuff, obj2.Stuff));
}


My prefered implementation would be something like this.

public sealed class NewObject
{
    private String Stuff { get; set; }

    // Use a method instead of a property because the operation is heavy.       
    public String GetAllStuff()
    {
        // Heavy string manipulation of this.Stuff.
        return this.Stuff;
    }

    // Or lets use a property because this.GetAllStuff() is not to heavy.
    public String AllStuff
    {
        get { return this.GetAllStuff(); }
    }

    public NewObject(String stuffToStartWith)
    {
        this.Stuff = stuffToStartWith;
    }

    public static NewObject operator +(NewObject obj1, NewObject obj2)
    {
        // Error handling goes here.

        return new NewObject(String.Concat(obj1.Stuff, obj2.Stuff);
    }
}
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Am I misunderstanding what you mean by "read only properties"? Right now I can code a property without a setter, making it read-only... –  Adam Robinson May 14 '09 at 16:29

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