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I'm trying to write safeAdd extention function for List class, so if it's not initialized yet - initialize it and add new value. But after I return from extension method, my just initialized list equals null. What's wrong?

Test class:

private class Test 
{
    public Test()
    {
        Id = Guid.NewGuid();
        //items = new List<string>();
    }
    public Guid Id { get; set; }
    public List<string> items { get; set; }
}

Extensions class:

public static class Helpers
{
    public static void safeAdd<T>(this List<T> list, T item)
    {
        if (list == null)
            list = new List<T>();
        list.Add(item);
    }
}

Part of main:

Test t = new Test();
t.items.safeAdd("testWord");
//Here t.items == null; WHY?
share|improve this question
up vote 7 down vote accepted

You have only assigned to a local method variable (which exists only inside the extension method) - this doesn't do anything to invoke the set, and to be honest there's no convenient way to get access to both the get and set without being verbose, or using lots of reflection / Expression code. IMO just do it in the class:

private List<string> items;
public List<string> Items { get {
     return items ?? (items = new List<string>()); } }

This will automatically initialize and assign the list the first time it is accessed.

It wouldn't be thread-safe unless I sync'd, or (perhaps preferable) used Interocked.CompareExchange for the assign. View  Interlocked it could be made thread-safe easily enough, but this is rarely a requirement for instance methods, and has associated overhead

share|improve this answer
    
But not only ValueTypes are cloned in a method? I thought that we should use ref or out modifiers only for them.. – Jentor Dec 26 '11 at 20:00
    
@Jentor unless otherwise specified everything is passed by value including reference types where the reference is passed by value so change what the parameter point to do not change what the argument passed points to and you can't use ref this so no straight forward way around it – Rune FS Dec 26 '11 at 20:22
1  
Any reason for choosing ?? over Lazy<T> or just out of habit? – Rune FS Dec 26 '11 at 20:33
1  
the ?? based approach is as far as I can see from the IL not thread safe (Can't find documentation proving or disproving that though). In this particular case that's not really a question since List<T> instance members aren't thread safe either. My question was thus to see if there was similar arguments where ?? solves problems Lazy<T> creates that made you choose ?? over Lazy<T> – Rune FS Dec 29 '11 at 9:58
1  
@RuneFS indeed, it wouldn't be thread-safe unless I sync'd, or (perhaps preferable) used Interocked.CompareExchange for the assign. View Interlocked it could be made thread-safe easily enough, but this is rarely a requirement for instance methods, and has associated overhead. – Marc Gravell Dec 29 '11 at 11:59

If you're using .NET 4.0, you can use the Lazy class to automatically handle lazy initialization. Your code then becomes:

private class Test 
{
    public Test()
    {
        Id = Guid.NewGuid();
        //items = new List<string>();
    }
    public Guid Id { get; set; }
    private Lazy<List<string>> _items = new Lazy<List<string>>();
    public List<string> items 
    { 
        get { return _items.Value; }
    }
}

You can then call Test.items.Add at any time. It will be initialized on first use.

See Lazy Initialization for more information.

share|improve this answer
    
As I mentioned in previous answer, MongoDB C# driver will serialize _items object anyway, even it is empty. But I want to get all the charm of using [BsonIgnoreIfNull] Attribute. – Jentor Dec 26 '11 at 20:51

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