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How to convert a "32-bit signed fixed-point number (16.16)" to a float?

Is (fixed >> 16) + (fixed & 0xffff) / 65536.0 ok? What about -2.5? And -0.5?

Or is fixed / 65536.0 the right way?

(PS: How does signed fixed-point "-0.5" looks like in memory anyway?)

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2  
Which language? –  Francis Upton Dec 26 '11 at 20:07

2 Answers 2

up vote 6 down vote accepted

I assume two's complement 32 bit integers and operators working as in C#.

How to do the conversion?

fixed / 65536.0

is correct and easy to understand.


(fixed >> 16) + (fixed & 0xffff) / 65536.0

Is equivalent to the above for positive integers, but slower, and harder to read. You're basically using the distributive law to separate a single division into two divisions, and write the first one using a bitshift.

For negative integers fixed & 0xffff doesn't give you the fractional bits, so it's not correct for negative numbers.

Look at the raw integer -1 which should map to -1/65536. This code returns 65535/65536 instead.


Depending on your compiler it might be faster to do:

fixed * (1/65536.0)

But I assume most modern compilers already do that optimization.

How does signed fixed-point "-0.5" looks like in memory anyway?

Inverting the conversion gives us:

RoundToInt(float*65536)

Setting float=-0.5 gives us: -32768.

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class FixedPointUtils {
  public static final int ONE = 0x10000;

  /**
   * Convert an array of floats to 16.16 fixed-point
   * @param arr The array
   * @return A newly allocated array of fixed-point values.
   */
  public static int[] toFixed(float[] arr) {
    int[] res = new int[arr.length];
    toFixed(arr, res);
    return res;
  }

  /**
   * Convert a float to  16.16 fixed-point representation
   * @param val The value to convert
   * @return The resulting fixed-point representation
   */
  public static int toFixed(float val) {
    return (int)(val * 65536F);
  }

  /**
   * Convert an array of floats to 16.16 fixed-point
   * @param arr The array of floats
   * @param storage The location to store the fixed-point values.
   */
  public static void toFixed(float[] arr, int[] storage)
  {
    for (int i=0;i<storage.length;i++) {
      storage[i] = toFixed(arr[i]);
    }
  }

  /**
   * Convert a 16.16 fixed-point value to floating point
   * @param val The fixed-point value
   * @return The equivalent floating-point value.
   */
  public static float toFloat(int val) {
    return ((float)val)/65536.0f;
  }

  /**
   * Convert an array of 16.16 fixed-point values to floating point
   * @param arr The array to convert
   * @return A newly allocated array of floats.
   */
  public static float[] toFloat(int[] arr) {
    float[] res = new float[arr.length];
    toFloat(arr, res);
    return res;
  }

  /**
   * Convert an array of 16.16 fixed-point values to floating point
   * @param arr The array to convert
   * @param storage Pre-allocated storage for the result.
   */
  public static void toFloat(int[] arr, float[] storage)
  {
    for (int i=0;i<storage.length;i++) {
      storage[i] = toFloat(arr[i]);
    }
  }

}
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