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I've come across an interesting behavior with Python 3 that I don't understand. I've understood that with the built-in immutable types like str, int, etc, that not only are two variables of the same value (both contain 'x') equal, they are literally the same object, which allows the use of the is operator. However, when I use the input() function, it seems to create a string object that is NOT the same object, but does have the same value.

Here's my python interactive prompt of this:

$ python
Python 3.2 (r32:88452, Feb 20 2011, 11:12:31) 
[GCC 4.2.1 (Apple Inc. build 5664)] on darwin
Type "help", "copyright", "credits" or "license" for more information.
>>> x = input()
test
>>> y = 'test'
>>> x is y
False
>>> x == y
True
>>> id(x)
4301225744
>>> id(y)
4301225576

Why is this?

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2  
This is just an informed guess, but I think that the string literals are interned, but the return value of input() is not. You could probably do the same thing with x = "".join('test') as it would create a new string object instead of returning the interned one –  Bwmat Dec 26 '11 at 20:31
    
This isn't specific to 3.x, BTW. –  Karl Knechtel Dec 26 '11 at 20:54
    
@Bwmat this should be an answer and is the only answer I would accept, since all the ones below are parroting something the OP already knows (that is is not the same as == in general). –  RoundTower Dec 26 '11 at 21:01
    
No, its not, but the input() function is. My question regarded the input() function from 3, which was raw_input before 3. –  Ryan Hiebert Dec 26 '11 at 21:02

5 Answers 5

up vote 2 down vote accepted

I've understood that with the built-in immutable types like str, int, etc, that not only are two variables of the same value (both contain 'x') equal, they are literally the same object, which allows the use of the is operator.

This is your misconception: concerning the ints and longs, that is valid only for a few values; with strings of any kind, it may be true concerning the strings of one module, but not otherwise.

But there is a builtin function intern() which interns any given string.

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Thank You. There were a couple of good answers that almost answered me, but this one was spot on. You saw my misconception about the built-in immutable types, and answered it directly. –  Ryan Hiebert Dec 26 '11 at 20:59
    
Nevertheless I added some information about intern()... –  glglgl Dec 26 '11 at 22:06

This is a properly behavior.

x == y #True because they have a the same value

x is y #False because x isn't reference to y
id(x) == id(y) #False because as the above

But:

x = input()
y = x  #rewrite reference of x to another variable
y == x and x is y and id(x) == id(y) #True 
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I understand why the equal operator works and the is operator does not. What I don't understand is why with this immutable type (str), it creates a new object instead of the typical python behavior of having them be the same literal object. –  Ryan Hiebert Dec 26 '11 at 20:32
    
Perhaps I simply misunderstood what happens. Is it that the literals always are the same object, but there can be different objects with the same values if they are created a different way? –  Ryan Hiebert Dec 26 '11 at 20:37
    
Because in order to 'have them be the same literal object", Python would have to somehow track down the first object in order to reuse it. It may be possible to process literals like that because they are created when the script is compiled, but it still isn't guaranteed; try setting up identical literals in two different modules, for example. –  Karl Knechtel Dec 26 '11 at 20:52

This is because of an implementation detail - you can't rely on is returning True in general. Try this script:

x = 'test'
y = 'test'
print('%r: \'x == y\' is %s, \'x is y\' is %s' % (x, x == y, x is y))
x = 'testtest'
y = 'testtest'
print('%r: \'x == y\' is %s, \'x is y\' is %s' % (x, x == y, x is y))
for i in range(1, 100):
    x = 'test' * i
    y = 'test' * i
    print('%d: %r: \'x == y\' is %s, \'x is y\' is %s' % (i, x, x == y, x is y))
    if x is not y:
        break

This prints

'test': 'x == y' is True, 'x is y' is True
'testtest': 'x == y' is True, 'x is y' is True
1: 'test': 'x == y' is True, 'x is y' is True
2: 'testtest': 'x == y' is True, 'x is y' is False

On Jython, is returns False even in the first print.

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Values that are the same are not guaranteed to be the same instance. That's merely an optimization that you can't rely on. There aren't very many times that using is is appropriate, use == instead.

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I've understood that with the built-in immutable types like str, int, etc, that not only are two variables of the same value (both contain 'x') equal, they are literally the same object

No, that is not guaranteed, in the same way that if I speak of an orange that is physically indistinguishable from the one you are holding, it is not guaranteed that I don't have some other orange in mind that simply happens to look identical.

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