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I'm having trouble working this out for inserting input values into database.

I have something like this

$("form#profileName").submit(function(){
    var updateName = $(this).serialize();
    $.post("update.php",{updateName: updateName},function(data){
        alert(data);
    });
    return false;
});

In my PHP I have something like this

if(isset($_POST['updateName'])){
    $fname = $_POST['updateName']['f_name'];
    $mname = $_POST['updateName']['m_name'];
    $lname = $_POST['updateName']['l_name'];
    $altname = $_POST['updateName']['alt_nam'];

    echo $fname." ".$mname." ".$lname." ".$altname;

}

its echoing out "f f f f" for some reason,

am I doing this correctly?

Thanks

share|improve this question
1  
Use something like fiddler 2 and capture the http request and look at what is being sent. Should significanly help determine if something is wrong on html form or in your code. Without the form nor the request, it's hard to determine where the problem is. –  Erik Philips Dec 26 '11 at 21:57
    
or just console.log(updateName) prior to the $.post –  babonk Dec 26 '11 at 21:59
    
I can just alert(updateName) and I get the correct values I'm supposed to. f_name=fsdaf&m_name=&l_name=&alt_nam=, thats if I don't add any values –  andrewliu Dec 26 '11 at 22:02

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Here's some documentation on .serialize()
You're basically serializing it twice.

var updateName = $(this).serialize(); //f_name=somename&m_name=some
$.ajax({
    ...
    data: {updateName: updateName} //{updateName: 'somename&m_name=some'}
    //which is translated into updateName=f_name%3dsomename%26m_name%3dsome
});

I'm going to take a wild guess and say that the reason it's outputting "f f f f" is because the $_POST['updateName'] is now a single string. Each individual character in PHP is accessed like this $string[n]. I suppose it's interpreting blank as 0, and gives you the first character, which is in fact "f".

Here's how it should look like:

$("form#profileName").submit(function(){
    var updateName = $(this).serialize();
    $.post("update.php",updateName,function(data){
        alert(data);
    });
    return false;
});

or, in my opinion, the beautiful and clean way,

$("form#profileName").submit(function(){
    var updateName = $(this).serialize();
    $.ajax({
        url: "update.php",
        type: "POST",
        data: updateName,
        success: function(msg){
            alert(data);
        }
    });
    return false;
});

And the PHP $_POST variable will now have several values, which are accessed like this:

$_POST['f_name']
$_POST['m_name']
...

Also note that in the PHP script, you might have to use urldecode() or rawurldecode() on your variables, depending on how you send the data in the JS (encodeURI() or encodeURIComponent()).

In this case, serialize() has it's own internal encodeURI(), so there is no need for it, but the PHP might need to decode it. If you're still having problems after you've fixed the 2xSerialize, just change the PHP script to decode the encoded data:

$fname = urldecode($_POST['f_name']);
$mname = urldecode($_POST['m_name']);
...

Sidenote:
If you've got an ID attr on the form, why not use: $("#profileName").submit(...)?
Makes more sense if you ask me.

Debugging
Depending on what browser you're using, you can check what XHR is sending to/recieving from the server. In Firefox you can use the plugin called Firebug (XHR panel is under Net->XHR)
Mike also mentioned debugging in Chrome:

Developer tools in chrome -> Network -> XHR at the bottom


Final solution

The solution should now look something like this:

Javascript:

$("form#profileName").submit(function(){
    var updateName = $(this).serialize();
    $.ajax({
        url: "update.php",
        type: "POST",
        data: updateName,
        success: function(msg){
            alert(data);
        }
    });
    return false;
});

PHP script "update.php":

if(isset($_POST)){
    $fname = $_POST['f_name'];    //urldecode($_POST['f_name']);
    $mname = $_POST['m_name'];    //urldecode($_POST['m_name']);
    $lname = $_POST['l_name'];    //urldecode($_POST['l_name']);
    $altname = $_POST['alt_nam']; //urldecode($_POST['alt_nam']);

    echo "$fname $mname $lname $altname";
}
share|improve this answer

You are setting the data to be send in the request to basically this:

{ updateName : "f_name=fsdaf&m_name=&l_name=&alt_nam=" }

This is going to be serialized again, so the value of updateName is a string when it arrives PHP side. You either want to pass an object:

$.post("update.php", { updateName : { f_name : "fsdaf", ... } }, function(data) {

or a string:

$.post("update.php", "f_name=fsdaf&m_name=&l_name=&alt_nam=", function(data) {

But not a mix of both.

share|improve this answer

Here is a copy/paste of code i currently use to do this same exact thing.. please note this is based on the codeigniter framework.

<?php

/**
 * get the post vars, explode the uri string
 * and then urldecode each section of the uri.
 * this will create a numerical array called $cat
 * that will have a list of the values from the form
 * you could use something similiar to explode/urldecode
 * into an associative array..
 */ 
$a = explode('&', $this->input->post('items'));
$i = 0;
while ($i < count($a)) {
    $b = explode('=', $a[$i]);
    $cat[] = urldecode($b[1]);
    $i++;
}

here you can see i serialize the categorylist, in this case im serializing a UL/LI but you could pass the css id of the form to serialize as well. Other people have told me im passing a serialized object, but it works and I have yet to see a performance hit for this.

/**
 * JSON/AJAX Submit for Categories
 * 
 * On submit of #submit JSON query site/process controller
 * returns json encoded arrays of points and their lat/lng, html and sidebarHtml
 * 
 * @return {json_array}
 * 
 * @author Mike DeVita
 * @category map_js
 */
$('.category').click(function(){
    /** make sure the checkbox that was clicked is checked, dont want to submit nothing, now do we? */
    if ($(this).is(":checked")){
        var items = $('#categoryList').serialize();
        /** animate the sidebar, close it onclick, hides the sidebar to show the full map */
        $('#button').click();
        /** delete the overlays from the map, effectively starts fresh */
        deleteOverlays();
        /** just in case were loading a crap ton of points, throw up a loading notice */
        showLoading();
        /** set a timeout of 275ms, this is so the sidebar collapses first.. adds to the ui magic */
        setTimeout(function(){
            /** ajax post call to the controller */
            $.post("index/process/categorylist.html", { "items": items },
            function(data){
                /** @type {numerical} if the returned errorStatus is == 1 */
                if (data.messageType == 'error'){
                    /** hide the loading notice */
                    hideLoading();
                    /** generate the error message, onClick dismiss the error message */
                    $.jGrowl(data.message, { theme: data.messageType });

                    /** generate the click event, to show the sidebar again */
                    $('#button').click();
                /** no errorStatus, so continue with populating map */
                }else{
                    /** @type {object} the returned point's information, set it to something more related */
                    var points = data;
                    /** setup the points, infobubbles, and sidebar */
                    setPoints(points);
                    /** display the overlays (sidebar, infobbubles, markers) */
                    showOverlays();
                    /** throw a class on every odd row of the sidebar */
                    $('.item:odd').addClass('sidebarAltRow');
                    /** everythings done, hide the loading notice */
                    hideLoading();  
                }
            }, "json"); //END Ajax post call to controller
        }, 275); //END TIMEOUT
    }//END IF checkbox is checked
}); //END SUBMIT CLICK FOR AJAX

i then use CI's built in sanitization libraries, verify the data they're submitting and then insert into the database. In my case in the form of an associative array.

update: i forgot to mention, i use google chrome developer tools to trouble shoot the XHR submit/receive and view whats going on with the form as it goes through its lifecycle. You can monitor the ajax submit/receive by going to developer tools in chrome -> network -> XHR at the bottom and then submitting the form.

share|improve this answer
    
-1 This looks extremely unnecessary, and confusing. Why are you using /**/ tags on comments that are on one line? How is this an answer? You're not even addressing or explaining his problem. –  ShadowScripter Dec 28 '11 at 13:48
    
both of those code blocks show how i submit via ajax, and urldecode in php. and the /**/ are from my plugin in textmate, not my choice. but who cares really? –  gorelative Dec 28 '11 at 13:54

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