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Here is a simple multiprocessing code:

from multiprocessing import Process, Manager

manager = Manager()
d = manager.dict()

def f():
    d[1].append(4)
    print d

if __name__ == '__main__':
    d[1] = []
    p = Process(target=f)
    p.start()
    p.join()

Output I get is:

{1: []}

Why don't I get {1: [4]} as the output?

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2  
I found this: bugs.python.org/issue6766. Is there a patch available? –  Bruce Dec 27 '11 at 1:25
    
d[1]+=[4] works!! –  Bruce Dec 27 '11 at 1:30
1  
manager.list() doesn't help –  J.F. Sebastian Dec 27 '11 at 6:51

2 Answers 2

Here is what you wrote:

# from here code executes in main process and all child processes
# every process makes all these imports
from multiprocessing import Process, Manager

# every process creates own 'manager' and 'd'
manager = Manager() 
# BTW, Manager is also child process, and 
# in its initialization it creates new Manager, and new Manager
# creates new and new and new
# Did you checked how many python processes were in your system? - a lot!
d = manager.dict()

def f():
    # 'd' - is that 'd', that is defined in globals in this, current process 
    d[1].append(4)
    print d

if __name__ == '__main__':
# from here code executes ONLY in main process 
    d[1] = []
    p = Process(target=f)
    p.start()
    p.join()

Here is what you should wrote:

from multiprocessing import Process, Manager
def f(d):
    d[1].append(4)
    print d

if __name__ == '__main__':
    manager = Manager() # create only 1 mgr
    d = manager.dict() # create only 1 dict
    d[1] = []
    p = Process(target=f,args=(d,)) # say to 'f', in which 'd' it should append
    p.start()
    p.join()
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I think this is a bug in manager proxy calls. You can circumvent avoiding call methods of shared list, like:

from multiprocessing import Process, Manager

manager = Manager()
d = manager.dict()

def f():
    # get the shared list
    shared_list = d[1]

    shared_list.append(4)

    # forces the shared list to 
    # be serialized back to manager
    d[1] = shared_list

    print d

if __name__ == '__main__':
    d[1] = []
    p = Process(target=f)
    p.start()
    p.join()

    print d
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