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How do I capture by move(also known as rvalue reference) in a C++11 lambda?

I am trying to write something like this(not actual code, but similar idea):

std::unique_ptr<int> myPointer(new int);

std::function<void(void)> = [std::move(myPointer)]{
   (*myPointer) = 4;
};
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4 Answers 4

up vote 17 down vote accepted

Generalized lambda capture in C++14

In C++14 we will have the so called generalized lambda capture. This enables move capture. The following will be legal code in C++14:

using namespace std;

// a unique_ptr is move-only
auto u = make_unique<some_type>( some, parameters );  

// move the unique_ptr into the lambda
go.run( [ u{move(u)} ] { do_something_with( u ); } ); 

But it is much more general in the sense that captured variables can be initialized with anything like so:

auto lambda = [value = 0] mutable { return ++value; };

In C++11 this is not possible yet, but with some tricks that involve helper types. Fortunately, the Clang 3.4 compiler already implements this awesome feature. The compiler will be released December 2013 or January 2014, if the recent release pace will be kept.

UPDATE: The Clang 3.4 compiler was released on 6 Jan 2014 with the said feature.

A workaround for move capture

Here's an implementation of a helper function make_rref which helps with artificial move capture

#include <cassert>
#include <memory>
#include <utility>

template <typename T>
struct rref_impl
{
    rref_impl() = delete;
    rref_impl( T && x ) : x{std::move(x)} {}
    rref_impl( rref_impl & other )
        : x{std::move(other.x)}, isCopied{true}
    {
        assert( other.isCopied == false );
    }
    rref_impl( rref_impl && other )
        : x{std::move(other.x)}, isCopied{std::move(other.isCopied)}
    {
    }
    rref_impl & operator=( rref_impl other ) = delete;
    T && move()
    {
        return std::move(x);
    }

private:
    T x;
    bool isCopied = false;
};

template<typename T> rref_impl<T> make_rref( T && x )
{
    return rref_impl<T>{ std::move(x) };
}

And here's a test case for that function that ran successfully on my gcc 4.7.3.

int main()
{
    std::unique_ptr<int> p{new int(0)};
    auto rref = make_rref( std::move(p) );
    auto lambda =
        [rref]() mutable -> std::unique_ptr<int> { return rref.move(); };
    assert(  lambda() );
    assert( !lambda() );
}

The drawback here is that lambda is copyable and when copied the assertion in the copy constructor of rref_impl fails leading to a runtime bug. The following might be a better and even more generic solution because the compiler will catch the error.

Emulating generalized lambda capture in C++11

Here's one more idea, on how to implement generalized lambda capture. The use of the function capture() (whose implementation is found further down) is as follows:

#include <cassert>
#include <memory>

int main()
{
    std::unique_ptr<int> p{new int(0)};
    auto lambda = capture( std::move(p),
        []( std::unique_ptr<int> & p ) { return std::move(p); } );
    assert(  lambda() );
    assert( !lambda() );
}

Here lambda is a functor object (almost a real lambda) which has captured std::move(p) as it is passed to capture(). The second argument of capture is a lambda which takes the captured variable as an argument. When lambda is used as a function object, then all arguments that are passed to it will be forwarded to the internal lambda as arguments after the captured variable. (In our case there are no further arguments to be forwarded). Essentially, the same as in the previous solution happens. Here's how capture is implemented:

#include <utility>

template <typename T, typename F>
class capture_impl
{
    T x;
    F f;
public:
    capture_impl( T && x, F && f )
        : x{std::forward<T>(x)}, f{std::forward<F>(f)}
    {}

    template <typename ...Ts> auto operator()( Ts&&...args )
        -> decltype(f( x, std::forward<Ts>(args)... ))
    {
        return f( x, std::forward<Ts>(args)... );
    }

    template <typename ...Ts> auto operator()( Ts&&...args ) const
        -> decltype(f( x, std::forward<Ts>(args)... ))
    {
        return f( x, std::forward<Ts>(args)... );
    }
};

template <typename T, typename F>
capture_impl<T,F> capture( T && x, F && f )
{
    return capture_impl<T,F>(
        std::forward<T>(x), std::forward<F>(f) );
}

This second solution is also cleaner, because it disables copying the lambda, if the captured type is not copyable. In the first solution that can only be checked at runtime with an assert().

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I have been using this long with G++-4.8 -std=c++11, and I thought it is a C++11 feature. Now I'm used of using this and suddenly realized it is a C++14 feature... What should I do!! –  RnMss Jan 29 at 11:51
    
@RnMss Which feature do you mean? Generalized lambda capture? –  Ralph Tandetzky Jan 29 at 17:54
    
@RalphTandetzky I think so, I just checked and the version of clang bundled with XCode seems to support it too! It gives a warning that it's a C++1y extension but it does work. –  Chris T May 21 at 17:07
    
@RnMss Either use a moveCapture wrapper to pass them as arguments (this method is used above and in Capn'Proto, a library by the creator of protobuffs) or make just accept that you require compilers that support it :P –  Chris T May 21 at 17:09
1  
No, it actually is not the same thing. Example: You want to spawn a thread with a lambda which move-captures the unique pointer. The spawning function can possibly return and the unique_ptr go out of scope before the functor gets executed. Therefore, you have a dangling reference to a unique_ptr. Welcome to undefined-behavior-land. –  Ralph Tandetzky Oct 8 at 10:59

You could also use std::bind to capture the unique_ptr:

std::function<void()> f = std::bind(
                              [] (std::unique_ptr<int>& p) { *p=4; },
                              std::move(myPointer)
                          );
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Thank you for posting this! –  mmocny Jan 16 '13 at 17:45
1  
Have you checked, if the code compiles? It doesn't look so to me, since firstly the variable name is missing and secondly a unique_ptr rvalue reference cannot bind to an int *. –  Ralph Tandetzky Apr 4 at 8:28
    
good catch, thanks! fixed. –  marton78 May 6 at 7:00

You cannot do that. Lambdas can only capture by copy or by non-constant (lvalue) reference.

You can build your own version of “std::rref” if you need; that's been done before.

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1  
@EthanSteinberg: Yeah, what happens if the lambda is copied after you capture by move? –  Omnifarious Dec 27 '11 at 1:42
2  
@Omnifarious The lambda should support whatever operations the arguments passed in support. If you pass in move-only objects, then you should get a move-only lambda. –  Lalaland Dec 27 '11 at 1:48
2  
@EthanSteinberg: Which means it's possible for a lambda object to have an 'empty' value. –  Omnifarious Dec 27 '11 at 1:55
2  
@KerrekSB that doesn't actually move anything. It simply stores a reference to the same soon-to-be-dead object. To move, you need to store by value along the way. –  R. Martinho Fernandes Apr 29 '12 at 1:38
4  
They are addressing this in C++14. As it currently stands in the draft, you will be able to 'move capture' variables in lambdas. The syntax is almost as it is in the question - just one extra variable to declare, e.g.: instead of '[std::move(myPointer)]' you will have to say '[=, mp = std::move(myPointer)]' and then use 'mp' inside lambda. More details on the proposal if you're interested: tinyurl.com/nwwgg6j. –  Sereger Jun 30 '13 at 8:21

You can achieve most of what you want using std::bind, like this:

std::unique_ptr<int> myPointer(new int{42});

auto lambda = std::bind([](std::unique_ptr<int>& myPointerArg){
    *myPointerArg = 4;
     myPointerArg.reset(new int{237});
}, std::move(myPointer));

The trick here is that instead of capturing your move-only object in the captures list, we make it an argument and then use partial application via std::bind to make it vanish. Note that the lambda takes it by reference, because it's actually stored in the bind object. I also added code that writes to the actual movable object, because that's something you might want to do.

In C++14, you can use generalized lambda capture to achieve the same ends, with this code:

std::unique_ptr<int> myPointer(new int{42});

auto lambda = [myPointerCapture = std::move(myPointer)]() mutable {
    *myPointerCapture = 56;
    myPointerCapture.reset(new int{237});
};

But this code doesn't buy you anything you didn't have in C++11 via std::bind. (There are some situations where generalized lambda capture is more powerful, but not in this case.)

Now there is just one problem; you wanted to put this function in a std::function, but that class requires that the function be CopyConstructible, but it isn't, it's only MoveConstructible because it's storing a std::unique_ptr which isn't CopyConstructible.

You to work around the issue with wrapper class and another level of indirection, but perhaps you don't need std::function at all. Depending on your needs, you may be able to use std::packaged_task; it'd do the same job as std::function, but it doesn't require the function to be copyable, only movable (similarly, std::packaged_task is only movable). The downside is that because it's intended to be used in conjunction with std::future, you can only call it once.

Here's a short program that shows all of these concepts.

#include <functional>   // for std::bind
#include <memory>       // for std::unique_ptr
#include <utility>      // for std::move
#include <future>       // for std::packaged_task
#include <iostream>     // printing
#include <type_traits>  // for std::result_of
#include <cstddef>

void showPtr(const char* name, const std::unique_ptr<size_t>& ptr)
{
    std::cout << "- &" << name << " = " << &ptr << ", " << name << ".get() = "
              << ptr.get();
    if (ptr)
        std::cout << ", *" << name << " = " << *ptr;
    std::cout << std::endl;
}

// If you must use std::function, but your function is MoveConstructable
// but not CopyConstructable, you can wrap it in a shared pointer.
template <typename F>
class shared_function : public std::shared_ptr<F> {
public:
    using std::shared_ptr<F>::shared_ptr;

    template <typename ...Args>
    auto operator()(Args&&...args) const
        -> typename std::result_of<F(Args...)>::type
    {
        return (*(this->get()))(std::forward<Args>(args)...);
    }
};

template <typename F>
shared_function<F> make_shared_fn(F&& f)
{
    return shared_function<F>{
        new typename std::remove_reference<F>::type{std::forward<F>(f)}};
}


int main()
{
    std::unique_ptr<size_t> myPointer(new size_t{42});
    showPtr("myPointer", myPointer);
    std::cout << "Creating lambda\n";

#if __cplusplus == 201103L // C++ 11

    // Use std::bind
    auto lambda = std::bind([](std::unique_ptr<size_t>& myPointerArg){
        showPtr("myPointerArg", myPointerArg);  
        *myPointerArg *= 56;                    // Reads our movable thing
        showPtr("myPointerArg", myPointerArg);
        myPointerArg.reset(new size_t{*myPointerArg * 237}); // Writes it
        showPtr("myPointerArg", myPointerArg);
    }, std::move(myPointer));

#elif __cplusplus > 201103L // C++14

    // Use generalized capture
    auto lambda = [myPointerCapture = std::move(myPointer)]() mutable {
        showPtr("myPointerCapture", myPointerCapture);
        *myPointerCapture *= 56;
        showPtr("myPointerCapture", myPointerCapture);
        myPointerCapture.reset(new size_t{*myPointerCapture * 237});
        showPtr("myPointerCapture", myPointerCapture);
    };

#else
    #error We need C++11
#endif

    showPtr("myPointer", myPointer);
    std::cout << "#1: lambda()\n";
    lambda();
    std::cout << "#2: lambda()\n";
    lambda();
    std::cout << "#3: lambda()\n";
    lambda();

#if ONLY_NEED_TO_CALL_ONCE
    // In some situations, std::packaged_task is an alternative to
    // std::function, e.g., if you only plan to call it once.  Otherwise
    // you need to write your own wrapper to handle move-only function.
    std::cout << "Moving to std::packaged_task\n";
    std::packaged_task<void()> f{std::move(lambda)};
    std::cout << "#4: f()\n";
    f();
#else
    // Otherwise, we need to turn our move-only function into one that can
    // be copied freely.  There is no guarantee that it'll only be copied
    // once, so we resort to using a shared pointer.
    std::cout << "Moving to std::function\n";
    std::function<void()> f{make_shared_fn(std::move(lambda))};
    std::cout << "#4: f()\n";
    f();
    std::cout << "#5: f()\n";
    f();
    std::cout << "#6: f()\n";
    f();
#endif
}

I've put a the above program on Coliru, so you can run and play with the code.

Here's some typical output...

- &myPointer = 0xbfffe5c0, myPointer.get() = 0x7ae3cfd0, *myPointer = 42
Creating lambda
- &myPointer = 0xbfffe5c0, myPointer.get() = 0x0
#1: lambda()
- &myPointerArg = 0xbfffe5b4, myPointerArg.get() = 0x7ae3cfd0, *myPointerArg = 42
- &myPointerArg = 0xbfffe5b4, myPointerArg.get() = 0x7ae3cfd0, *myPointerArg = 2352
- &myPointerArg = 0xbfffe5b4, myPointerArg.get() = 0x7ae3cfe0, *myPointerArg = 557424
#2: lambda()
- &myPointerArg = 0xbfffe5b4, myPointerArg.get() = 0x7ae3cfe0, *myPointerArg = 557424
- &myPointerArg = 0xbfffe5b4, myPointerArg.get() = 0x7ae3cfe0, *myPointerArg = 31215744
- &myPointerArg = 0xbfffe5b4, myPointerArg.get() = 0x7ae3cfd0, *myPointerArg = 3103164032
#3: lambda()
- &myPointerArg = 0xbfffe5b4, myPointerArg.get() = 0x7ae3cfd0, *myPointerArg = 3103164032
- &myPointerArg = 0xbfffe5b4, myPointerArg.get() = 0x7ae3cfd0, *myPointerArg = 1978493952
- &myPointerArg = 0xbfffe5b4, myPointerArg.get() = 0x7ae3cfe0, *myPointerArg = 751631360
Moving to std::function
#4: f()
- &myPointerArg = 0x7ae3cfd4, myPointerArg.get() = 0x7ae3cfe0, *myPointerArg = 751631360
- &myPointerArg = 0x7ae3cfd4, myPointerArg.get() = 0x7ae3cfe0, *myPointerArg = 3436650496
- &myPointerArg = 0x7ae3cfd4, myPointerArg.get() = 0x7ae3d000, *myPointerArg = 2737348608
#5: f()
- &myPointerArg = 0x7ae3cfd4, myPointerArg.get() = 0x7ae3d000, *myPointerArg = 2737348608
- &myPointerArg = 0x7ae3cfd4, myPointerArg.get() = 0x7ae3d000, *myPointerArg = 2967666688
- &myPointerArg = 0x7ae3cfd4, myPointerArg.get() = 0x7ae3cfe0, *myPointerArg = 3257335808
#6: f()
- &myPointerArg = 0x7ae3cfd4, myPointerArg.get() = 0x7ae3cfe0, *myPointerArg = 3257335808
- &myPointerArg = 0x7ae3cfd4, myPointerArg.get() = 0x7ae3cfe0, *myPointerArg = 2022178816
- &myPointerArg = 0x7ae3cfd4, myPointerArg.get() = 0x7ae3d000, *myPointerArg = 2515009536

You get to see heap locations being reused, showing that the std::unique_ptr is working properly. You also see the function itself move around when we stash it in a wrapper we feed to std::function.

If we switch to using std::packaged_task, it the last part becomes

Moving to std::packaged_task
#4: f()
- &myPointerArg = 0xbfffe590, myPointerArg.get() = 0x7ae3cfe0, *myPointerArg = 751631360
- &myPointerArg = 0xbfffe590, myPointerArg.get() = 0x7ae3cfe0, *myPointerArg = 3436650496
- &myPointerArg = 0xbfffe590, myPointerArg.get() = 0x7ae3d000, *myPointerArg = 2737348608

so we see that the function has been moved, but rather than getting moved onto the heap, it's inside the std::packaged_task that's on the stack.

Hope this helps!

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