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I am using the following code in php to extract username, password and email:

$subject = "fjcljt # 123456789 # chengyong702@126.com";
$pattern2 = '/^(\w+\ # ){2}?\w+ ?/';
preg_match($pattern2, $subject, $matches);

but the returned result using print_r is Array ( [0] => fjcljt # 123456789 # chengyong702 [1] => 123456789 # )

What am I doing wrong with preg_match here?

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If you just want to separate username password and email in array then try explode(' # ', $subject); –  Uday Sawant Dec 27 '11 at 5:17
    
Would pattern "any number of alphanum" for the username, "any non-hash for the password", and "any alphanum, @, any alnum, period, any alnum" work for you? (alnum is alpha-numeric, fyi) –  FakeRainBrigand Dec 27 '11 at 5:17

6 Answers 6

if " # " delimits your values...no need for regex at all...

$subject = "fjcljt # 123456789 # chengyong702@126.com";
$subject = array_map('trim',explode("#",$subject));
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The result of preg_match captures the entire string in [0], and then each captured group in [i]. A captured group is denoted by the brackets in your $pattern2. Since there's only one set of brackets, there's only one captured group.

Even though your pattern matches twice, only the latest match is stored group 1, being 123456789 # (overriding the fjcljt #).

To get explicit groups you have to write the captured groups in your regex explicitly as opposed to with the {2}:

$pattern2 = '/^(\w+\ # )(\w+\ # )\w+ ?/';

Then your return array will have [1] bein fjcljt # and [2] being 1123456789 #.

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I thought this expression inspired by your help '/^(\w+(?= # ))(\w+(?= # ))([\w@.]+(?= ?)$/' would remove " # ", but actually it did not, what the new expression would be like if i want to remove " # " from the matched results? –  David Dec 27 '11 at 7:23
    
try /^(\w+)\ # (\w+)\ # ([@\w]+) ?/, the brackets in my solution surround the # and space so they are included in the matches. To not have them, don't include them in the brackets. @CrayonViolent's answer is best though! –  mathematical.coffee Dec 27 '11 at 10:03
list($username, $password, $email) = explode(' # ', $subject);
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Try using explode instead of regex. regular expression use more resources.

$data = explode('#','fjcljt # 123456789 # chengyong702@126.com');

then you can access data like below:

$data[0]; //username
$data[1]; //password
$data[2]; //email

EDIT for whitespace use delimiter like below:

" # "

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doesn't account for whitespace –  Crayon Violent Dec 27 '11 at 5:20

It's two things here. First you are using a quantifier {2} on a match group (..). What happens is that you only get the last of the two matches as result group [1]. If you wanted to get both numbers/words separately, you have to expand the regex.

The second problem is that \w+ does not include @. So you only get half the email.

$pattern2 = '/^(\w+) # (\w+) # ([\w@.]+)/';

Might be what you wanted.

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I thought this expression inspired by your help '/^(\w+(?= # ))(\w+(?= # ))([\w@.]+(?= ?)$/' would remove " # ", but actually it did not, what the new expression would be like if i want to remove " # " from the matched results? –  David Dec 27 '11 at 7:23
    
You can't remove. Truncating the [0] match group is possible by appending a \K to the regex. –  mario Dec 27 '11 at 7:24

Not sure what the F bomb your trying to do, however if your trying to get login credentials you could try something like this

if(preg_match('/^.*\@.*$/i', $type_of_login) > 0)
{
$request = User::get_by_email($type_of_login);
}
else
{
   //get by username or whatevers....
}


//then extract the password!!
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