Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

I can't seem to find a more efficient way to "copy" an embedded resource to disk, than the following:

using (BinaryReader reader = new BinaryReader(
    assembly.GetManifestResourceStream(@"Namespace.Resources.File.ext")))
{
    using (BinaryWriter writer
        = new BinaryWriter(new FileStream(path, FileMode.Create)))
    {
        long bytesLeft = reader.BaseStream.Length;
        while (bytesLeft > 0)
        {
            // 65535L is < Int32.MaxValue, so no need to test for overflow
            byte[] chunk = reader.ReadBytes((int)Math.Min(bytesLeft, 65536L));
            writer.Write(chunk);

            bytesLeft -= chunk.Length;
        }
    }
}

There appears to be no more direct way to do the copy, unless I'm missing something...

share|improve this question
2  
It looks fine to me. Does it feel like too many lines of code? – Cheeso May 14 '09 at 15:58
    
It feels like there should be a more direct way than chunking. – user7116 May 14 '09 at 16:07
up vote 49 down vote accepted

I'm not sure why you're using BinaryReader/BinaryWriter at all. Personally I'd start off with a useful utility method:

public static void CopyStream(Stream input, Stream output)
{
    // Insert null checking here for production
    byte[] buffer = new byte[8192];

    int bytesRead;
    while ((bytesRead = input.Read(buffer, 0, buffer.Length)) > 0)
    {
        output.Write(buffer, 0, bytesRead);
    }
}

then call it:

using (Stream input = assembly.GetManifestResourceStream(resourceName))
using (Stream output = File.Create(path))
{
    CopyStream(input, output);
}

You can change the buffer size of course, or have it as a parameter to the method - but the main point is that this is simpler code. Is it more efficient? Nope. Are you sure you really need this code to be more efficient? Do you actually have hundreds of megabytes you need to write out to disk?

I find I rarely need code to be ultra-efficient, but I almost always need it to be simple. The sort of difference in performance that you might see between this and a "clever" approach (if one is even available) isn't likely to be a complexity-changing effect (e.g. O(n) to O(log n)) - and that's the type of performance gain which really can be worth chasing.

EDIT: As noted in comments, .NET 4.0 has Stream.CopyTo so you don't need to code this up yourself.

share|improve this answer
    
Glorious, I guess I've fallen prey to ignoring the Stream class. Poor, poor Stream. – user7116 May 14 '09 at 16:14
    
The file in question is between 5-10MB, so it is negligible in terms of speed. I was looking for something that was simple/concise (since simple/concise tends to mean efficient). – user7116 May 14 '09 at 16:17
    
I tried changing to CopyTo(), and ran into a lot of "The process cannot access the file <filename> because it is being used by another process." errors from ASP.NET (cause the Stream is still open). I went back to using the usings to clear that up. – eduncan911 Mar 11 '11 at 0:41
1  
@eduncan911: Using CopyTo doesn't change whether or not you need using statements. It just changes how the process of copying itself happens, while the streams are open. – Jon Skeet Mar 11 '11 at 6:22

Personally I would do it this way:

using (BinaryReader reader = new BinaryReader(
    assembly.GetManifestResourceStream(@"Namespace.Resources.File.ext")))
{
    using (BinaryWriter writer
        = new BinaryWriter(new FileStream(path, FileMode.Create)))
    {
        byte[] buffer = new byte[64 * 1024];
        int numread = reader.Read(buffer,0,buffer.Length);

        while (numread > 0)
        {
            writer.Write(buffer,0,numread);
            numread = reader.Read(buffer,0,buffer.Length);
        }

        writer.Flush();
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
I like that minus the flush, but excluding a more direct way, I think I'm going to take yours as the answer. – user7116 May 14 '09 at 16:08

You will have to write a loop, if that's your question. But you could do without the reader and writer since the basic Stream already deals with byte[] data.

This is about as compact as I can get:

using (Stream inStream = File.OpenRead(inputFile))
using (Stream outStream = File.OpenWrite(outputFile))
{
    int read;
    byte[] buffer = new byte[64 * 1024];

    while ((read = inStream.Read(buffer, 0, buffer.Length)) > 0)
    {
        outStream.Write(buffer, 0, read);
    }
}
share|improve this answer

If the resource (file) is binary.

File.WriteAllBytes("C:\ResourceName", Resources.ResourceName);

And if the resource (file) is text.

 File.WriteAllText("C:\ResourceName", Resources.ResourceName);
share|improve this answer
    
This is the only reasonable answer! Everyone else is providing absurd constructs with multiple streams, buffers and over 10 lines when this one line does the same. – Traubenfuchs Mar 3 '14 at 14:48
    
This approach looks at the very least incomplete. The .NET 4.0 documentation for File.WriteAllBytes indicates that the second argument is a byte array whose content is to be written to the file. And the documentation for File.WriteAllText indicates that the second argument is the string to write to the file. So, specifying Resources.ResourceName as the second argument doesn't really make sense. – DavidRR Nov 13 '15 at 14:43
    
If Resources.ResourceName is binary the type of Resources.ResourceName is Byte[] as required, and it will work as expected. Does this make it complete/clear for you? – KoalaBear Nov 13 '15 at 18:56

I actually ended up using this single line: Assembly.GetExecutingAssembly().GetManifestResourceStream("[Project].[File]").CopyTo(New FileStream(FileLocation, FileMode.Create)). Of course, this is for .Net 4.0

Update: I found that the line above might keep a file locked such that SQLite reports that the database is read-only. Therefore I ended up with the following:

Using newFile As Stream = New FileStream(FileLocation, FileMode.Create)
    Assembly.GetExecutingAssembly().GetManifestResourceStream("[Project].[File]").CopyTo(newFile)
End Using
share|improve this answer
3  
+1, definitely the way to go .Net 4.0+. I'd also note a quick way to create FileStreams is with the static methods on the File object, like File.Create(). – user7116 Apr 14 '12 at 1:09

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.