Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I need help writing a program that converts full sentences to binary code (ascii -> decimal ->binary), and vice-versa, but I am having trouble doing it. Right now I am working on ascii->binary.

ascii characters have decimal values. a = 97, b = 98, etc. I want to get the decimal value of an ascii character and convert it to a dinary or binary decimal, like 10 (in decimal) in binary is simply:

10 (decimal) == 1010 (binary)

So the ascii decimal value of a and b is:

97, 98

This in binary is (plus the space character which is 32, thanks):

11000011000001100010 == "a b"

11000011100010 == "ab"

I have written this:

int c_to_b(char c)
{
    return (printf("%d", (c ^= 64 ^= 32 ^= 16 ^= 8 ^= 4 ^= 2 ^= 1 ^= 0));
}

int s_to_b(char *s)
{
    long bin_buf = 0;

    for (int i = 0; s[i] != '\0'; i++)
    {
        bin_buf += s[i] ^= 64 ^= 32 ^= 16 ^= 8 ^= 4 ^= 2 ^= 1 ^= 0;
    }

    return printf("%d", bin_buf);
}

code examples

main.c

int main(void)
{
    // this should print out each binary value for each character in this string
    // eg: h = 104, e = 101
    // print decimal to binary 104 and 101 which would be equivalent to:
    // 11010001100101
    // s_to_b returns printf so it should print automatically
    s_to_b("hello, world!");
    return 0;
}

To elaborate, the for loop in the second snippet loops through each character in the character array until it hits the null terminator. Each time it counts a character, it gets does that operation. Am I using the right operation?

share|improve this question
    
What does "converts full sentences to binary code" mean? –  Carl Norum Dec 27 '11 at 6:05
7  
You may need to narrow this down to something more specific. Generally "doesn't work, do it for me" isn't very productive. –  i_am_jorf Dec 27 '11 at 6:06
    
Why do you code c ^= 64 which means c = c ^ 64 ? And I don't understand if it is homework, and what is your requirement?? –  Basile Starynkevitch Dec 27 '11 at 6:10
2  
You might need to re-thing your understanding of character sets. Everything in a computer is represented in binary, thus ASCII is a "binary code" in the sense that every ASCII character is a number represented in binary. Perhaps you should give an example of the desired transformation as well as a detailed descriptions of how it should work. –  André Caron Dec 27 '11 at 6:12
2  
Your description is still unclear. It seems there are hidden rules, such as spaces. A space is character 32 in ASCII, which would give it a binay code of 00100000, making "a b" map to "1100001001000001100010", not "1100001 1100010". –  André Caron Dec 27 '11 at 6:27

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Maybe you want something like

void s_to_b(const char*s)
{
  if (s != NULL) {
     while (*s) {
        int c = *s;
        printf(" %d", c);
        s++;
     }
     putc('\n');
  }
}
share|improve this answer
    
yes exactly like this, but i believe it prints out the characters in decimal (it printed values over 1, like 9). is there a way to make the characters print out in binary rather than decimal? –  evolon696 Dec 27 '11 at 6:48
1  
Code a function print_in_binary and replace the call to printf with print_in_binary(c); –  Basile Starynkevitch Dec 27 '11 at 6:57
    
here is what i came up with: int print_in_binary(char c) { int q = c; while ((q / 2) != 0) { q = (c / 2); } printf(" %d", q); } –  evolon696 Dec 27 '11 at 7:08
1  
This probably prints the bits but from last to first. You should put them in an array first, then display in reverse order. –  Basile Starynkevitch Dec 27 '11 at 7:11
    
thanks so much! –  evolon696 Dec 27 '11 at 7:19

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.