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How to drop a column which is having Default constraint in SQL Server 2008?

My query is

alter table tbloffers
drop column checkin

I am getting below error

ALTER TABLE DROP COLUMN checkin failed because one or more objects access this column.

Can anyone correct my query to drop a column with constraint?

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marked as duplicate by BoltClock Nov 13 '13 at 13:00

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

    
there might be some references to this table from other tables which is causing this error. –  Pankaj Upadhyay Dec 27 '11 at 6:59

5 Answers 5

up vote 44 down vote accepted

First you should drop the problematic DEFAULT constraint, after that you can drop the column

alter table tbloffers drop constraint [ConstraintName]
GO
alter table tbloffers drop column checkin

But the error may appear from other reasons - for example the user defined function or view with SCHEMABINGING option set for them.

UPD: Completely automated dropping of constraints script:

DECLARE @sql NVARCHAR(MAX)
WHILE 1=1
BEGIN
    SELECT TOP 1 @sql = N'alter table tbloffers drop constraint ['+dc.NAME+N']'
    from sys.default_constraints dc
    JOIN sys.columns c
        ON c.default_object_id = dc.object_id
    WHERE 
        dc.parent_object_id = OBJECT_ID('tbloffers')
    AND c.name = N'checkin'
    IF @@ROWCOUNT = 0 BREAK
    EXEC (@sql)
END
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Here's another way to drop a default constraint with an unknown name without having to first run a separate query to get the constraint name:

DECLARE @ConstraintName nvarchar(200)
SELECT @ConstraintName = Name FROM SYS.DEFAULT_CONSTRAINTS
WHERE PARENT_OBJECT_ID = OBJECT_ID('__TableName__')
AND PARENT_COLUMN_ID = (SELECT column_id FROM sys.columns
                        WHERE NAME = N'__ColumnName__'
                        AND object_id = OBJECT_ID(N'__TableName__'))
IF @ConstraintName IS NOT NULL
EXEC('ALTER TABLE __TableName__ DROP CONSTRAINT ' + @ConstraintName)
share|improve this answer
    
A superb answer, thank you. I did upvote the above answer also, though, just out of that flinchy old habit of SELECTing and inspecting first before deciding to drop. –  noogrub Jan 13 at 16:46

Find the default constraint with this query here:

SELECT
    df.name 'Constraint Name' ,
    t.name 'Table Name',
    c.NAME 'Column Name'
FROM sys.default_constraints df
INNER JOIN sys.tables t ON df.parent_object_id = t.object_id
INNER JOIN sys.columns c ON df.parent_object_id = c.object_id AND df.parent_column_id = c.column_id

This gives you the name of the default constraint, as well as the table and column name.

When you have that information you need to first drop the default constraint:

ALTER TABLE dbo.YourTable
DROP CONSTRAINT name-of-the-default-constraint-here

and then you can drop the column

ALTER TABLE dbo.YourTable DROP COLUMN YourColumn
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It doesn't have to be done sequentially. You can do them both at the same time. –  Martin Smith Dec 27 '11 at 22:16
    
@MartinSmith: OK, great - thanks for sharing! I wasn't aware of this possibility - you learn something new every day! :-) –  marc_s Dec 28 '11 at 5:57
    
Can someone please provide an example for how to combine these two statements. I need somethink like: ALTER TABLE table DROP CONSTRAINT DF_XY DROP COLUMN XY Unfortunately the syntax of this statement isn't correct –  My-Name-Is Jun 3 '13 at 16:27
1  
@My-Name-Is: if you check out Martin's answer, you need to put a comma between the two DROP commands to make this work –  marc_s Jun 3 '13 at 16:34

You can also drop the column and its constraint(s) in a single statement rather than individually.

CREATE TABLE #T
  (
     Col1 INT CONSTRAINT UQ UNIQUE CONSTRAINT CK CHECK (Col1 > 5),
     Col2 INT
  )

ALTER TABLE #T DROP CONSTRAINT UQ , 
                    CONSTRAINT CK, 
                    COLUMN Col1


DROP TABLE #T 
share|improve this answer
    
This requires you to know the name of the constraint, though. If they ahven't been named during table creation they get an automatically-generated name. –  Joey Oct 2 '12 at 10:08
1  
@Joey - There is no syntax to drop constraints without knowing the name. It is a required argument to DROP CONSTRAINT see grammar If you don't name the constraints explicitly then you'll have to look up the name SQL Server generated for it e.g. as per marc's answer. But having found that out you can still drop the constraint and column at the same time. –  Martin Smith Oct 2 '12 at 10:17
    
Nice code, I needed to drop mulitple constraints at once, but not the column. Your alter did the trick. Thanks!! –  htm11h Jul 12 '13 at 16:14

I got the same:

ALTER TABLE DROP COLUMN failed because one or more objects access this column message.

My column had an index which needed to be deleted first. Using sys.indexes did the trick:

DECLARE @sql VARCHAR(max)

SELECT @sql = 'DROP INDEX ' + idx.NAME + ' ON tblName'
FROM sys.indexes idx
INNER JOIN sys.tables tbl ON idx.object_id = tbl.object_id
INNER JOIN sys.index_columns idxCol ON idx.index_id = idxCol.index_id
INNER JOIN sys.columns col ON idxCol.column_id = col.column_id
WHERE idx.type <> 0
    AND tbl.NAME = 'tblName'
    AND col.NAME = 'colName'

EXEC sp_executeSql @sql
GO

ALTER TABLE tblName
DROP COLUMN colName
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