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Why does alert(p1) show null?

http://pastebin.com/VAKwwEge

<!DOCTYPE html>
<html>
<head>
    <script type="text/javascript" src="js/product.js"></script>
</head>
<body>
    Device:<select id="device" name="device" style="width:250px;"> </select>                      Line:<select id="line" name="line" style="width:250px;"> </select>
</body>
</html>
window.onload = load();
function load() {
    var p1 = document.getElementById("device");
    var l1 = document.getElementById("line");
    alert(p1);
    alert(l1);
}
share|improve this question
    
mine worked –  OnesimusUnbound Dec 27 '11 at 7:01
    
You're wrong. It doesn't show null: jsfiddle.net/5DjuW –  bjornd Dec 27 '11 at 7:02
1  
Guys, buy default jsfiddle wraps the call into the onLoad event of the library (by default MooTools) . You should choose no wrap (head) in the left panel to reproduce the issue –  Alexander Yezutov Dec 27 '11 at 7:04
    
The jsfiddle comments posted are not valid because they are set to execute the given JavaScript during the mootools onLoad event. There's no reason to downvote this question. –  wsanville Dec 27 '11 at 7:07

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

You need to change this line:

window.onload = load();

To read the following:

window.onload = load;

Note the difference, the first example will invoke the load() function, and assign its return value to window.onload, which of course will be undefined.

The second example will assign the function itself to window.onload, which is what you want, and will alert [object HTMLSelectElement] (in Firefox anyways).

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THX for your help! –  wenchiching Dec 27 '11 at 7:17

Change your code to this:

function load() {
    var p1 = document.getElementById("device");
    var l1 = document.getElementById("line");
    alert(p1);
    alert(l1);
}
window.onload = load;

The assignment to onload needs to be a function reference, not the execution of the function (no parens).

Somewhat simpler would be using an anonymous function like this:

window.onload = function() {
    var p1 = document.getElementById("device");
    var l1 = document.getElementById("line");
    alert(p1);
    alert(l1);
}
share|improve this answer
    
Your second point, The assignment to onload needs to be after the definition of the function is not true, but the rest of your answer is sound. –  wsanville Dec 27 '11 at 7:06
    
Second point removed. Example using anonymous function added. –  jfriend00 Dec 27 '11 at 7:07
    
The last edit made it worthy ... +1 –  vdbuilder Dec 27 '11 at 7:15
    
THX for your help! –  wenchiching Dec 27 '11 at 7:18

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