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I am trying realize python like indent-depending grammar.

Source example:

ABC QWE
  CDE EFG
  EFG CDE
    ABC 
  QWE ZXC

As i see, what i need is to realize two tokens INDENT and DEDENT, so i could write something like:

grammar mygrammar;
text: (ID | block)+;
block: INDENT (ID|block)+ DEDENT;
INDENT: ????;
DEDENT: ????;

Is there any simple way to realize this using ANTLR?

(I'd prefer, if it's possible, to use standard ANTLR lexer.)

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3 Answers 3

up vote 12 down vote accepted

I don't know what the easiest way to handle it is, but the following is a relatively easy way. Whenever you match a line break in your lexer, optionally match one or more spaces. If there are spaces after the line break, compare the length of these spaces with the current indent-size. If it's more than the current indent size, emit an Indent token, if it's less than the current indent-size, emit a Dedent token and if it's the same, don't do anything.

You'll also want to emit a number of Dedent tokens at the end of the file to let every Indent have a matching Dedent token.

For this to work properly, you must add a leading and trailing line break to your input source file!

A quick demo:

grammar PyEsque;

options {
  output=AST;
}

tokens {
  BLOCK;
}

@lexer::members {

  private int previousIndents = -1;
  private int indentLevel = 0;
  java.util.Queue<Token> tokens = new java.util.LinkedList<Token>();

  @Override
  public void emit(Token t) {
    state.token = t;
    tokens.offer(t);
  }

  @Override
  public Token nextToken() {
    super.nextToken();
    return tokens.isEmpty() ? Token.EOF_TOKEN : tokens.poll();
  }

  private void jump(int ttype) {
    indentLevel += (ttype == Dedent ? -1 : 1);
    emit(new CommonToken(ttype, "level=" + indentLevel));
  }
}

parse
 : block EOF -> block
 ;

block
 : Indent block_atoms Dedent -> ^(BLOCK block_atoms)
 ;

block_atoms
 :  (Id | block)+
 ;

NewLine
 : NL SP?
   {
     int n = $SP.text == null ? 0 : $SP.text.length();
     if(n > previousIndents) {
       jump(Indent);
       previousIndents = n;
     }
     else if(n < previousIndents) {
       jump(Dedent);
       previousIndents = n;
     }
     else if(input.LA(1) == EOF) {
       while(indentLevel > 0) {
         jump(Dedent);
       }
     }
     else {
       skip();
     }
   }
 ;

Id
 : ('a'..'z' | 'A'..'Z')+
 ;

SpaceChars
 : SP {skip();}
 ;

fragment NL     : '\r'? '\n' | '\r';
fragment SP     : (' ' | '\t')+;
fragment Indent : ;
fragment Dedent : ;

You can test the parser with the class:

import org.antlr.runtime.*;
import org.antlr.runtime.tree.*;
import org.antlr.stringtemplate.*;

public class Main {
  public static void main(String[] args) throws Exception {
    PyEsqueLexer lexer = new PyEsqueLexer(new ANTLRFileStream("in.txt"));
    PyEsqueParser parser = new PyEsqueParser(new CommonTokenStream(lexer));
    CommonTree tree = (CommonTree)parser.parse().getTree();
    DOTTreeGenerator gen = new DOTTreeGenerator();
    StringTemplate st = gen.toDOT(tree);
    System.out.println(st);
  }
}    

If you now put the following in a file called in.txt:


AAA AAAAA
  BBB BB B
  BB BBBBB BB
    CCCCCC C CC
  BB BBBBBB
    C CCC
      DDD DD D
      DDD D DDD

(Note the leading and trailing line breaks!)

then you'll see output that corresponds to the following AST:

enter image description here

Note that my demo wouldn't produce enough dedents in succession, like dedenting from ccc to aaa (2 dedent tokens are needed):

aaa
  bbb
    ccc
aaa

You would need to adjust the code inside else if(n < previousIndents) { ... } to possibly emit more than 1 dedent token based on the difference between n and previousIndents. Off the top of my head, that could look like this:

 else if(n < previousIndents) {
   // Note: assuming indent-size is 2. Jumping from previousIndents=6 
   // to n=2 will result in emitting 2 `Dedent` tokens
   int numDedents = (previousIndents - n) / 2; 
   while(numDedents-- > 0) {
     jump(Dedent);
   }
   previousIndents = n;
 }
share|improve this answer
    
Thanx, it works :) –  Astronavigator Dec 27 '11 at 11:32
    
You're welcome @Astronavigator. –  Bart Kiers Dec 27 '11 at 11:54
    
Hi @Bart Kiers, how can I overcome the leading and trailing linebreaks limitation? I tried to make it emit an Indent token programmatically before the starting the parsing, but no luck. –  ains Sep 5 '13 at 10:02
    
@0xZhen, feel free to post a question of your own where you can also post the code you're working on. These comment areas aren't well suited for Q&A's. –  Bart Kiers Sep 5 '13 at 11:24

Have you looked at the Python ANTLR grammar?

Edit: Added psuedo Python code for creating INDENT/DEDENT tokens

UNKNOWN_TOKEN = 0
INDENT_TOKEN = 1
DEDENT_TOKEN = 2

# filestream has already been processed so that each character is a newline and
# every tab outside of quotations is converted to 8 spaces.
def GetIndentationTokens(filestream):
    # Stores (indentation_token, line, character_index)
    indentation_record = list()
    line = 0
    character_index = 0
    column = 0
    counting_whitespace = true
    indentations = list()
    for c in filestream:
        if IsNewLine(c):
            character_index = 0
            column = 0
            line += 1
            counting_whitespace = true
        elif c != ' ' and counting_whitespace:
            counting_whitespace = false
            if(len(indentations) == 0):
                indentation_record.append((token, line, character_index))
            else:
                while(len(indentations) > 0 and indentations[-1] != column:
                    if(column < indentations[-1]):
                        indentations.pop()
                        indentation_record.append((
                            DEDENT, line, character_index))
                    elif(column > indentations[-1]):
                        indentations.append(column)
                        indentation_record.append((
                            INDENT, line, character_index))

        if not IsNewLine(c):
            column += 1

        character_index += 1
    while(len(indentations) > 0):
        indentations.pop()
        indentation_record.append((DEDENT_TOKEN, line, character_index))
    return indentation_record
share|improve this answer
    
Yep. This grammar has no implementation of INDENT and DEDENT rules. It seems that this grammar uses not standard lexer... –  Astronavigator Dec 27 '11 at 9:15
    
@Astronavigator Well, having looked at Python's Lexical Analysis approach to indentation‌​, their INDENT and DEDENT tokens are produced in a separate process (which can be performed prior to passing to ANTLR). When you look at it their way, it's much simpler. –  Keldon Alleyne Dec 27 '11 at 10:09
    
Thanx for answer, JSPerfUnknown. Well, perfoming INDENT and DEDENT tokens prior to passing to ANTLR is a good point. I'll think about it. For now i'd prefer using only standard lexer, so accept Bart's answer. –  Astronavigator Dec 27 '11 at 11:44

There is an open-source library antlr-denter for ANTLR v4 that helps parse indents and dedents for you. Check out its README for how to use it.

Since it is a library, rather than code snippets to copy-and-paste into your grammar, its indentation-handling can be updated separately from the rest of your grammar.

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