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I am writing a simple console application to read 3 words and keep them in an array. But after taking three inputs from the console it only displays the third word three times in the console. For example, if I give the input: "one", "two" "three" the output shows only "three" 3 times).

Here is my code:

int main(int argc, char *argv[])
{
    char* input[30];  
    char word[30]; 

    int i=0;

    for(i=0; i<3 ;++i)
    {
       cin >> word;
       input[i] = word;
    }

    input[i] = 0;
    i=0;

    while(input[i])
    {
      cout << input[i] << endl;
      i++;
    }

    return 0;
}

What I am doing wrong here? Thanks for any help.

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3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

You only have one buffer ( char word[30] ), which you are overwriting each time.

When you do:

input[i] = word;

You're assigning the address of the first element in that one and only buffer to each element in input (arrays degrade to pointers when you use the bare name). You end up with three copies of the same address in input[] (which is address of word, which contains the last thing your read from cin)

One approach to fix this would be to use strdup() and assign the newly allocated string to your input[i]

for(i=0; i<3 ;++i)
{
   cin >> word;
   input[i] = strdup(word);
}

Also ... if you only are going to have three input "words" you only need an array of 3 char pointers:

char *input[3];

and your output loop would look much like your input loop:

for(i=0; i<3 ;++i)
{
   cout << input[i] << endl;
}

Edit: Note that this answer was based on your wanting to use arrays. If this isn't homework that requires that, see bobbymcr's answer - when in C++, use C++.

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Thanks. Which header file do i need to include using strdup() function? –  lycon Dec 27 '11 at 8:08
    
string.h ... I was thinking it was also in C++ <cstring> but the docs are proving me wrong –  Brian Roach Dec 27 '11 at 8:11

You marked your question as "C++" (not "C") so I will recommend that you actually use C++ idioms to do this. Modern programs should not be using raw char arrays and pointers except for low level programming and interoperability with legacy or barebones C APIs.

Consider using string and vector as they will make your life much easier. Here is a reimplementation of your program using these types. Aside from the iterator stuff (which I admit is a bit strange until you get used to it), it should seem a lot clearer than the equivalent using char *, etc.

#include <iostream>
#include <vector>
#include <string>

using namespace std;

int main(int argc, char ** argv)
{
    vector<string> input;

    for (int i = 0; i < 3; ++i)
    {
        string word;
        cin >> word; 
        input.push_back(word);
    }

    for (vector<string>::const_iterator it = input.cbegin(); it != input.cend(); ++it)
    { 
        cout << *it << endl;
    }

    return 0;
} 
share|improve this answer
    
i agree with you, but actually examining low level programming –  lycon Dec 27 '11 at 7:55

The problem is here:

char* input[30]; 

You maybe tempted to think that this is array of character array, but in essence it's not.

You would either need to dynamically allocate space for the array, or simply use two dimensional character array(fixing the max number of words that you can have).

char input[30][30]; // maximum 30 words having at most 29 characters each
share|improve this answer
    
replacing char* input[30] with char input[30][3], gives error in compile time "incompatible types in assignment of 'char [30]' to 'char [3]'" in following two lines input[i] = word; and input[i] = 0; –  lycon Dec 27 '11 at 7:45
    
@lycon: You can't assign char* that way. You have to use strcpy(). –  Shamim Hafiz Dec 27 '11 at 9:29

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