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I've seen this question: Class design with vector as a private/public member?, but I don't feel that it answers the question.

I have a class called PrimeSieve that can be initialized as PrimeSieve s(10000) to perform actions such as checking whether a number under 10000 is prime or listing all the primes under 10000. In particular, I'm wondering how to perform the latter function.

Currently, I'm doing this, which I think violates the principles of OOP:

class PrimeSieve {
public:
...
     std::vector<long long> primes;

The client will never need to change the vector, but how can I still allow the client to iterate through a vector of all of the primes under some number (using things like vector.size()? I've thought about an accessor method that returns the vector by value, but that seems inefficient.

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5 Answers 5

up vote 8 down vote accepted

I would define the class as:

class PrimeSieve 
{
public:

    typedef std::vector<long long>::const_iterator const_iterator;

    const_iterator begin() const  { return primes.begin(); }
    const_iterator end() const  { return primes.end(); }

    long long  operator[](int index) const { return primes[i]; }

    size_t   size() const { return primes.size(); }

    //rest of the members which compute the primes!

private:
   std::vector<long long> primes ;
} ;

I think the user of the class should have read-only access to the vector, so I used const_iterator in the typedef definition. Also note that the operator[] is a const member function which means you can only access the value, but cannot modify it.

Usage:

 PrimeSieve sieve(1000); //compute

 //print to stdout
 std::copy(sieve.begin(), 
           sieve.end(), 
           std::ostream_iterator<long long>(std::cout, " "));
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1  
This is a good approach, as it allows some implementation details to vary later with client code continuing to work unchanged (after a recompile). Specifically, the implementation of the iterators could be changed later to e.g. generate an arbitrary number of results (CPU time allowing), rather than having a hard-coded limit, and the most crucial client usage - begin() and dereferencing/incrementing the iterator it returns - could continue to work. That's one reason to consider whether you really need end() and size() in your interface: can the client decide when they've "had enough"? –  Tony D Dec 27 '11 at 9:43
    
Thanks for the answer! I'm curious about weighing the two possibilities--what are the advantages of this approach over the one suggested by TonyK's below? –  Louis Dec 27 '11 at 10:35
    
@Louis: As the comment before yours says this solution has the flexibility to change internally without requiring the client to change their code, as this doesn't expose the internal details of the implementation. For example, if you change std::vector to std::list, the client code would not need to change, as the client works with pair of iterators, and it need not worry about whether PriveSieve internally uses vector or list.[contd.] –  Nawaz Dec 27 '11 at 10:47
    
[contd] However, the other solution by @TonyK depends on the internal details, so if you change std::vector to std::list, the client have to change the code as well. –  Nawaz Dec 27 '11 at 10:49

This is one way to do it:

class PrimeSieve {
public:
  const std::vector<long long>& getPrimes() const {
    return primes ;
    }
private:
  std::vector<long long> primes ;
} ;

There is no inefficiency here -- returning a reference is at least as efficient as returning a pointer. And the client can iterate through the vector returned by getPrimes (using a const_iterator, naturally).

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public:
    const std::vector<long long>* getPrimes() const { return &primes; }
private:
    std::vector<long long> primes;

This gives clients access to a const pointer to primes which means they can iterate over it but cannot modify it.

(My syntax may be wrong; it's been a few years since I've done any serious C++)

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The basic rule is:
You make the data member private & then provide public/protected member functions to expose the functionality/operations which is provided on the private data member.

You should follow the same rule here.

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Another possibility is do design a special iterator class:

class PrimeSieve {
  mutable std::vector<long long> primes;
 public:

  class const_iterator;
  friend class const_iterator;
  class const_iterator{   // should probably inherit from some std::iterator class, not sure there
    const PrimeSieve *domain;
    unsigned index;
   public:
    const_iterator(const PrimeSieve &d): domain(&d), index(0) {}
    const long long &operator *() const{return domain->primes[index];}
    const_iterator &operator++(){
      if (++index >= domain->primes.size()) {
        // calculate a number of "new" primes here
      }
      return *this;
    }
  }

  const_iterator begin() const {return const_iterator(*this);}
};

The good thing about this is that the container is now "infinite": primes are calculated lazily as needed, rather than up to a given upper bound.

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1  
This is a good pattern, but the sieve algorithm is designed around a fixed upper bound. –  Krumelur Dec 27 '11 at 10:31
    
@Krumelur yes, but it's easy to expand the algorithm so that you can continue the calculation from that bound, and if you increase the bound in the same manner as std::vector increases its memory then the computional overhead amortizes. –  leftaroundabout Dec 27 '11 at 11:10

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