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I am new to LINQ. I have a method like this:

public bool IsNullOrEmptyDataTable(DataSet objDataset, int tableNo)
{
    if (objDataset != null)
    {
        if (objDataset.Tables.Count > 0)
        {
            if (objDataset.Tables[tableNo].Rows.Count > 0)
            {
                return false;
            }
            else
            {
                return true;
            }
        }
        else
        {
            return true;
        }
    }
    else
    { 
        return true;
    }
}

Can anyone rewrite the business logic in LINQ to save lines of code?

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closed as off topic by JMax, AVD, Cody Gray, Kuntady Nithesh, bkaid Jan 21 '12 at 7:26

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1  
You can save 7 lines of code just by directly returning the result of a comparison in the innermost if, e.g. return objDataset.Tables[tableNo].Rows.Count == 0. You can save even more lines (~8) if you get rid of all the else clauses and have an unconditional return true outside the outermost if. –  bobbymcr Dec 27 '11 at 10:12
    
You are trying to improve your code by making it shorter. It is not always true that shorter code is better code. Because code is written once but read many times, what you really want is clear code. Switching a simple query to LINQ will probably make it shorter but more difficult to understand; switching a very complex query to LINQ might make it both shorter and easier to understand. In this case, as shown in the answers, simply removing the unnecessary else branches makes the test clearer. –  Matthew Strawbridge Dec 27 '11 at 10:31
    
Look Ma! An arrowhead! –  nulltoken Dec 27 '11 at 10:45
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4 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted

The other answers have shown how you can (and should, IMO) do this without LINQ - but they've both still got the same problem that your original code does: you're only checking whether the data set has any tables - it could have fewer than tableNo tables. I would suggest:

public bool IsNullOrEmptyDataTable(DataSet objDataset, int tableNo)
{
    return objDataset == null ||
           objDataset.Table.Count <= tableNo ||
           objDataset.Tables[tableNo].Rows.Count == 0;
}
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Your expression is negated from what the OP posted. You might want to surround that with a !( and a ). –  Adam Maras Dec 27 '11 at 10:16
    
@AdamMaras: Whoops - was basing this on another answer to start with. Fixed, but just by reversing the conditions. –  Jon Skeet Dec 27 '11 at 10:17
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Why linq ?

public bool IsNullOrEmptyDataTable(DataSet objDataset, int tableNo)
{
    return (objDataset != null && objDataset.Table.Count > 0 && objDataset.Tables[tableNo].Rows.Count > 0);
}
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1  
You can remove the ? operator –  Jan Dec 27 '11 at 10:13
    
Yes, I just seen it too –  Nop Dec 27 '11 at 10:14
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  public bool IsNullOrEmptyDataTable(DataSet objDataset, int tableNo)
        {
            return objDataset == null || (objDataset.Tables.Count <= 0 || objDataset.Tables[tableNo].Rows.Count <= 0);
        }

There is no need to use LINQ for this

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There's absolutely no use in using LINQ for this; LINQ is for working with the data contained in collections, not checking properties of an object that manages said collections.

That being said, you can greatly simplify this code by combining all of your conditions into one boolean expression.

return objDataset == null ||
       objDataset.Tables.Count == 0 ||
       objDataset.Tables[tableNo].Rows.Count == 0;
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