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I want to do something like this code:

myType a;
a->foo();

void foo()
{
   cout << a->bar(); 
}
void bar()
{
   cout << a->bar2();
}
void bar2()
{
   cout << a->bar3();
}

In another word, when a member function is called, can we use the original caller?

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2  
to me it's not clear what you're actually asking - is foo supposed to be a method of the class myType? But then you could just use this to reference what I think you're referring to as "original caller" (the variable a). –  codeling Dec 27 '11 at 10:27
    
Please clarify your code example. It wouldn't compile and it doesn't clearly state WHAT you actually want to do. –  Alex Dec 27 '11 at 10:30
1  
Please explain better what you are trying to do. Show us where "bar" is defined. –  Mike Nakis Dec 27 '11 at 10:30
    
Your edit of the original post adds zero information. You are still not telling us which class each function belongs to. We are not magicians, you know. We cannot guess what you have in your mind. –  Mike Nakis Dec 27 '11 at 10:41

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

You want:

cout << this->bar();

Or, more simply

cout << bar();

This IBM C++ documentation explains it pretty well. Have a look.

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supposing bar() is a method of myType, as well as foo(); looking at the code it looks more like bar is a member variable of myType... –  codeling Dec 27 '11 at 10:28
    
Is that valid for more than one level call? –  mahmood Dec 27 '11 at 10:29
    
@mahmood: what kind of level are you referring to? recursion level? –  codeling Dec 27 '11 at 10:29
    
@nyarlathotep: I edited the original post, foo() and bar() are member function for myType –  mahmood Dec 27 '11 at 10:30
1  
I don't think he wants the recursion stuff, I think he just wants to access a member in the object he created that's an instance of myType, which is what I'm saying in my answer. –  Francis Upton Dec 27 '11 at 10:35

What you're probably trying to do is something like this:

#include <iostream>

class myType {
    void foo()
    {
       std::cout << bar(); 
    }
    void bar()
    {
       std::cout << bar2();
    }
    void bar2()
    {
       std::cout << bar3();
    }
};

... and in e.g. main method:

int main(int argc, char** argv)
{
    myType a;
    a->foo();
}

Inside a class, you can refer to methods of the same class just by their name, and they will be called on the same object as the original method! If you want to highlight that you're referring to methods of the same object, use e.g. this->bar() instead of bar(); it is only necessary in cases where there are other names (e.g. method parameters) which would conceal the class members, but it can be used all the time.

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