Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Scala's handling of superclass constructor parameters is confusing me...

with this code:

class ArrayElement(val contents: Array[String]) {
   ...
}

class LineElement(s: String) extends ArrayElement(Array(s)) {
  ...
}

LineElement is declared to extend ArrayElement, it seems strange to me that the Array(s) parameter in ArrayElement(Array(s)) is creating an Array instance - runtime??? Is this scala's syntatic sugar or is there something else going on here?

share|improve this question

2 Answers 2

up vote 9 down vote accepted

Yes, the Array(s) expression is evaluated at run-time.

class Foo (val x: Int)
class Bar (x: Int, y: Int) extends Foo(x + y)

Scala allows expressions in the calls to a superclass' constructor (similar to what Java does with its use of super(...)). These expressions are evaluated at run-time.

share|improve this answer
    
I guess it is scala syntactic sugar then... things like: class LineElement(s: String) extends ArrayElement({ println(">> SubClass!"); Array(s)}) {...} is possible –  Dzhu Dec 27 '11 at 23:23

Actually The Array(s) is evaluated at run-time because the structure you've used is an effective call to primary constructor of your super class.

To recall, a class can only have on primary constructor that takes arguments in its definition class A(param:AnyRef), other constructors are called this and are mandate to call the primary constructor (or to chain constructors up to it).

And, such a constraint exists on super call, that is, a sub class primary constructor calls the super primary constructor.

Here is how to see such Scala structure

class Foo (val x: Int)
class Bar (x: Int, y: Int) extends Foo(x + y)

the Java counterpart

public class Foo {
  private x:int;
  public Foo(x:int) {
    this.x = x;
  }
  public int getX() {
    return x;
  }
}

public class Bar {
  private y:int;

  public Bar(x:int, y:int) {
    /**** here is when your array will be created  *****/
    super(x+y); 
    this.y = y;
  }

    public int getY() {
    return y;
  }
}
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.