Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'm trying to illustrate a doubly linked list problem. this is from an old test i've been studying lately.

The question is as follows:

draw what the final linked after this code:

ListNode n1 = new ListNode();
ListNode n2 = new ListNode();
ListNode n3 = n1;
n1.next = n2;
n3.prev = n1;
n1.next.prev = n3.next;

Where I get lost is the final line of code.

n1.next.prev = n3.next;

here's the solution:

http://www.imagechicken.com/viewpic.php?p=1242322384048558300&x=jpg

can anyone walk me through this one or lead me in a good direction?

share|improve this question
1  
That line that you don't understand sets n2.prev to itself. All the nodes prev members point back to themselves. n1 and n3's next member points to n2. n2's next member is undefined. –  Jason Coco May 14 '09 at 16:39
    
I think you need to give a little more information on this question - I'm not sure what you're asking about? Why don't you understand why n1.next.prev = n3.next works? It this about the mixing of l-values and r-values (a major cause for confusion in learning about pointers)? You have the right illustration linked (you could have included that in the question as well). –  jamuraa May 14 '09 at 16:42

5 Answers 5

up vote 3 down vote accepted

The key to this one is that n1 and n3 point to the same ListNode.

Here are the states after each of the 3 operations:

n1.next = n2;
// n1.prev = null;
// n1.next = n2;
// n2.prev = null;
// n2.next = null;
// n3.prev = null;
// n3.next = n2;

n3.prev = n1;
// n1.prev = n1;
// n1.next = n2;
// n2.prev = null;
// n2.next = null;
// n3.prev = n1;
// n3.next = n2;

n1.next.prev = n3.next;
// n1.prev = n1;
// n1.next = n2;
// n2.prev = n2;
// n2.next = null;
// n3.prev = n1;
// n3.next = n2;

So in that last statement, n3.next is the same as n1.next, which is n2. Thus, the last statement is equivalent to settings n2.prev = n2.

share|improve this answer

Step one: Two nodes, not linked. n1 is also known as n3.

      +-------+next        +-------+next
      |       +---->       |       +---->
  prev|   n1  |        prev|   n2  |    
 <----+   n3  |       <----+       |   
      +-------+            +-------+   

Step two: n1.next = n2;

      +-------+next        +-------+next
      |       +----------->|       +---->
  prev|   n1  |        prev|   n2  |    
 <----+   n3  |       <----+       |   
      +-------+            +-------+   

Step three: n3.prev = n1;
Since n3 is n1, this turns the arrow around.

      +-------+next        +-------+next
      |       +----------->|       +---->
  prev|   n1  |        prev|   n2  |    
 /----+   n3  |       <----+       |   
 \--->+-------+            +-------+   

Step four: n1.next.prev = n3.next;
Remember that n1.next is n2, and n3 is n1. Follow the arrows:

      +-------+next        +-------+next
      |       +----------->|       +---->
  prev|   n1  |        prev|   n2  |    
 /----+   n3  |       /----+       |   
 \--->+-------+       \--->+-------+   

So the prev pointers of n1 and n2 both end up pointing to themselves.

share|improve this answer

I would try drawing three boxes. Divide each box into thirds - one third for the label, one third for "prev", and one third for "next". Then draw connecting lines from all the "prev" and "next" to the appropriate label to see how things are linked.

A picture can be worth a thousand words.

share|improve this answer
1  
Two boxes would probably make it easier, since n1 and n3 are just different names for the same node. –  Chad Birch May 14 '09 at 16:46

This sort of thing gets confusing, until you realize that there are only two INSTANCES of ListNode; n1, n2, and n3 are all referring to those instances. And in particular, the values of n1, n2, and n3 are only set once; since the value of n3 is set to n1, you could just as easily replace n3 with n1 in this code, and it would work the same.

share|improve this answer

Sorry -- could not make heads or tails out of the picture.

n1.next = n2. Therefor, n1.next.prev evaluates to n2.prev

n3 = n1. Therefore, n3.next evaluates to n1.next.

You are setting n2.prev to n1.next.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.