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I would like to know if there is a way to prevent PHP from sending a cookie when calling session_start().

My use case is for a site optimisation:

  • (1a) I first open a session/send headers.
  • (1b) Then generate and output some text content.
  • (1c) To enhance session read/write I call "session_write_close" as soon as I don't need to write in the session anymore.
  • (2) Finally I have a post-page rendering process (for stats) that requires a write access to the session. The session is closed, I cannot call session_start() again since it sends a cookie and it's to late for that. This is a computation-heavy process, so I have to do it after the page is sent to the client.

The client already received a session-cookie. So I don't need session_start() to send a new (and redundant) one.

Does someone know a way to intercept the cookie or something similar ? Of course I want to avoid the "Cannot send session cookie - headers already sent". This error is invisible for the user because the page is already renderered but it looks ugly in the logs.

My question seems to be a redundant one, but it is not. I know how headers and content work (send headers first, content after). It's just that PHP does not let me do what I want.

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2 Answers 2

up vote 5 down vote accepted

I would like to know if there is a way to prevent PHP from sending a cookie when calling session_start().

Yes there is, by telling PHP to not use cookies for sessions. The PHP setting is session.use_cookies:

ini_set('session.use_cookies', 0); # disable session cookies
session_start();

By default cookies are enabled because they are considered more safe then using URL parameters (see Sessions and security­Docs).

(2) Finally I have a post-page rendering process (for stats) that requires a write access to the session. The session is closed, I cannot call session_start() again since it sends a cookie and it's to late for that. This is a computation-heavy process, so I have to do it after the page is sent to the client.

It's probably possible to tell PHP that the cookie is already set by adding it into the $_COOKIE superglobal array­Docs. I never experimented with it, but in case you use session_start() and PHP sees that the session cookie has been already set (by the browser, not PHP, $_COOKIE represent the browser cookies), it won't send the headers (again) to set the cookie (which as I understand you is what you want).


Edit: Some test script to play around with:

<?php
header('Content-Type: text/plain;');

echo "Incomming Cookies:\n";
print_r($_COOKIE);

// to simulate that this is a new session, the session cookie is removed
// which makes PHP think it is a new session when invoking session_start()
// unset($_COOKIE['PHPSESSID']);

// run the first session
session_start(); // creates the session cookie (as we don't have one yet)
printf("Session %s has been started: %s\n", session_name(), session_id());
var_dump($_SESSION);
$_SESSION['variable'] = isset($_SESSION['variable']) ? $_SESSION['variable']++ : 0;
session_commit();

printf("Session has been closed, remaining id is: %s\n", session_id());

// visual confirmation that session cookie has been created
echo "Outgoing Cookies:\n";
print_r(headers_list());

// run the second session
ini_set('session.use_cookies', 0); # disable session cookies
session_start();
printf("Second session %s has been started: %s\n", session_name(), session_id());
var_dump($_SESSION);
$_SESSION['2nd-variable'] = isset($_SESSION['2nd-variable']) ? $_SESSION['2nd-variable']++ : 0;
session_commit();

You need to call it with a web-browser (and PHP sessions must be configured to work).

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Great, the first solution works ini_set('session.use_cookies', 0). The second solution does not seem to have any effects (I already tried it yesterday actually) but it can be relative to my php configuration. I will spend some more time later on this second solution. Thanks ! –  Mat Dec 27 '11 at 11:26
    
I did run some tests with $_COOKIE. It actually works but this would be the same as using ini_set(); and with ini_set() it's more clear what it does. I'll add a script to the answer I used for playing around, some code about $_COOKIE is commented. Uncomment it to generate a new session id for the first session. This also shows how $_COOKIE is related to session_start(). –  hakre Dec 27 '11 at 11:53
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You can use ob_start() function to buffer the headers/content, you may clear the buffer contents using ob_clean()

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ob_start does not buffer header. Only body content. So it doe snot work. –  Mat Dec 27 '11 at 11:32
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