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I have a following set of codes

int main(){
   int x = 36;
   int const * p1;
   p1 = &x;

   printf("Values at p1: %d\n", *p1); 
   p1=0;

   printf("Addresses pointed to by p1: %p ", &p1); 
   return 0;
}

gives

Addresses pointed to by p1 gives 0028FF480

   int main(){
   int x = 36;
   int const * p1;
   p1 = &x;

   printf("Values at p1: %d\n", *p1); 
   p1=0;

   printf("Addresses pointed to by p1: %p ", p1); 
   return 0;
   }

Addresses pointed to by p1 gives 00000000

Why such a difference..?I thought both will give me same value.

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1  
Whay do you think that p1 and &p1 should be the same? –  Alex Farber Dec 27 '11 at 11:33
    
ohh shit i got u..thanks. –  user882196 Dec 27 '11 at 11:37
4  
dev-c++ comes with an ancienct compiler. Try codeblocks or qtcreator or eclipse with cdt but not dev-c++. –  marcus hatchenson Dec 27 '11 at 11:38
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3 Answers

Both are different hence the difference in output.

p1 returns the address of the variable pointed by the pointer.

&p1 returns the address where the pointer p1 itself is stored in memory.

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And the pointer P1 is most likely stored in a very different place from the place it points to. –  Raveline Dec 27 '11 at 12:19
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Initially p1 stores the address of x (which you obtained with &x). Later on you set p1 to store a null address.

In the first snippet you decided to print not the address stored in p1, but the address of p1 itself. p1 is a variable like any other, and just like with the rest of them, &p1 will give you the address of that variable. That's different from the value stored in it, which is accessible with p1 and is what the second snippet prints.

I like pictures

Like any other variable, you cannot change the address of the variable p1, you can only change the value it stores, and in the case of a pointer it just so happens that value is an address.

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p1=0;

will set the pointer that points to "p1" to zero, not the content of it which should be done by

*p1=0;
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it's a ponter to constant u cannot do that :) –  user882196 Dec 27 '11 at 11:35
    
In your example its not possible, but I said it to explain the difference. Its all that happens, in the first example you set the pointer to zero and display it, in the second you create a new pointer and display its address. –  Listing Dec 27 '11 at 11:38
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