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I have the following EventHandler to which I added a parameter MusicNote music:

public void PlayMusicEvent(object sender, EventArgs e,MusicNote music)
{
    music.player.Stop();
    System.Timers.Timer myTimer = (System.Timers.Timer)sender;
    myTimer.Stop();
}

I need to add the handler to a Timer like so:

myTimer.Elapsed += new ElapsedEventHandler(PlayMusicEvent(this, e, musicNote));

but get the error:

"Method name expected"

EDIT: In this case I just pass e from the method which contains this code snippet, how would I pass the timer's own EventArgs?

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marked as duplicate by nawfal, Chris Lätta, Jean-Bernard Pellerin, Wesley Wiser, Juha Syrjälä May 6 '13 at 16:47

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

3 Answers 3

up vote 92 down vote accepted

Timer.Elapsed expects method of specific signature (with arguments object and EventArgs). If you want to use your PlayMusicEvent method with additional argument evaluated during event registration, you can use lambda expression as an adapter:

myTimer.Elapsed += new ElapsedEventHandler((sender, e) => PlayMusicEvent(sender, e, musicNote));

Edit: you can also use shorter version:

myTimer.Elapsed += (sender, e) => PlayMusicEvent(sender, e, musicNote);
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Thanks it worked! I had to change the names of sender and e in the first set of brackets because they were the same as in the containing method. Could you please explain to me what they are? i.e. what's the difference between sender, e in the first bracket and the ones in the second? –  Matt Dec 27 '11 at 11:57
3  
(sender, e) => PlayMusicEvent(sender, e, musicNote) is anonymous method. Values in first brackets are actual parameter names and values in second brackets are actual parameters' usage. Think of it as short form for void NONAME(var sender, var e) { PlayMusicEvent(sender, e, musicNote); } where parameter names are inferred from context and musicNote is taken from local variables. This one line creates new method that uses your method and sets it as handler for timer's event. –  MagnatLU Dec 27 '11 at 12:00
3  
And how to remove this eventHandler? -= does not work. –  Yassine Houssni Mar 2 '13 at 14:59
1  
@EruRōraito stackoverflow.com/questions/17995339/… –  TruthOf42 Aug 1 '13 at 13:42
    
awesome answer, thanks –  Jhoon Bey Mar 5 '14 at 7:36

If I understand your problem correctly, you are calling a method instead of passing it as a parameter. Try the following:

myTimer.Elapsed += PlayMusicEvent;

where

public void PlayMusicEvent(object sender, ElapsedEventArgs e)
{
    music.player.Stop();
    System.Timers.Timer myTimer = (System.Timers.Timer)sender;
    myTimer.Stop();
}

But you need to think about where to store your note.

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Unfortunately I must say: that doesn't work! Event handlers are always using the same pattern: 1. argument: the sender and second argument: the event arguments. Those event arguments can be special, but there must be someone, who fills them on call! In your special sample there isn't anybody, who can fill you additional argument! Timer.Tick expects an event method with an object as first and EventArgs as second parameter. So you can't set your function!

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